Category Archives: Visiting a Museum in New Jersey

Hanover Heritage Association/Whippany Burying Yard 325 Route 10 East Whippany, NJ 07054

Don’t miss touring one of the oldest cemeteries in New Jersey.

Take time tour the cemetery on one of their organized tours.

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Hanover Heritage Association/Whippany Burying Yard

325 Route 10 East

Whippany, NJ 07054

https://www.hanovertownship.com/1396/Whippany-Burying-Yard

https://whippany.net/whippany-burying-yard

(973) 539-5355

Open: Check the website/Cemetery Hours

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46925-d23534409-Reviews-The_Whippany_Burying_Yard-Whippany_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html

On my last stop of touring Historic Morris County for the “Pathways for History ” event, I visited the Whippany Burial Yard at 325 Route 10 in Whippany. The old cemetery is steeped in history as one of the oldest cemeteries in New Jersey and home to many Revolutionary and Civil War veterans. As we learned on the tour later on, the only people that can be buried there now are former Mayors of the Town of Whippany who have died.

Historical Marker at the cemetery

Two of the founding families of the town have many family members buried here, the Tuttle’s who still have relatives living in the area and the Kitchel’s. The guide for the afternoon took us on an hour tour…

View original post 904 more words

Whippany Railway Museum 1 Railroad Plaza Whippany, NJ 07981

Don’t forget to take the hour long tour of the grounds of the museum and see all the railroad cars. It is so interesting.

Don’t miss this fascinating tour into New Jersey’s Rail past!

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Whippany Railway Museum

1 Railroad Plaza

Whippany, NJ 07981

(973) 887-8177

http://www.whippanyrailwaymuseum.net/

https://www.facebook.com/WhippanyRailwayMuseum/

Open: Sunday 12:00pm-4:00pm/Monday-Saturday Closed/Seasonal

Admission: Please check the website for seasonality

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46925-d3395271-Reviews-Whippany_Railway_Museum-Whippany_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html

Video on the Whippany Railway Museum

I have to say that I was very impressed by the Whippany Railway Museum. It was not one of those usual train museums with bric-a-brac and posters and a uniform here and there. The museum building itself is a highly organized history of the rail system not just in New Jersey but all over the country. It showcases how New Jersey played a big role in the growth of the rail system and how transportation has changed over the last 100 years.

The museum displays were highly organized and well documented with all sorts of equipment of how a train functions, lighting equipment for the outdoors, and indoor dining, menus and manners for a time…

View original post 1,122 more words

The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation 25 Cooper Street Denville, NJ 07834

Don’t miss this interesting site for a look into New Jersey’s rural past.

The Ayres/Knuth Farm in Denville, NJ

The historic marker for the farm

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation Inc.

25 Cooper Street

Denville, NJ 07834

(973) 625-9345

https://www.ayresknuth.org/

https://www.facebook.com/AyresKnuthFarm/

Open: See website on hours/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g46392-d24065367-r838840100-Ayres_knuth_Farm-Denville_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Video on the Ayres/Knuth Farm

On the second day of the Morris County, NJ “Pathways to History’ tour, I was on my way back to Morris County for a second day of adventure. My first stop on the tour was the Ayres/Knuth Farm (The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation Inc.), a former working farm just off Route 10.

The main farmhouse on the Ayres/Knuth Farm

Not only was the site open for touring but they also had a mini car show with antique cars and fire trucks owned by some of the members. Seeing some of these Model T Ford’s and Steam Engine Fire Trucks in perfect condition shows American quality motorship at its finest.

What I liked about the farm is that it had been a…

View original post 1,057 more words

Union Schoolhouse & Union Church and Burial Ground/Washington Township Historical Society 6 Fairview Avenue Long Valley, NJ 07853

Take the time to do the one-hour tour of the site. It is an interesting look at New Jersey’s Colonial past.

Don’t miss the one-hour tour of the property. It is really interesting and gives you the opportunity to see New Jersey’s past.

The Church and Cemetery tour

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Union Schoolhouse & Union Church and Burial Ground/

Washington Township Historical Society

6 Fairview Avenue

Long Valley, NJ 07853

(908) 876-9696

https://www.wthsnj.org/

https://br-fr.facebook.com/wthsnj

http://www.pathwaysofhistorynj.net/19.html

Open: Sunday 2:00pm-4:00pm/Monday-Saturday Closed

Admission: please call site

My review on TripAdvisor:

A Video on the Washington Township Historical Society

I came to the Washington Township Historical Site as part of Morris County’s “Pathways of History” tour and visited the Union Schoolhouse Museum and then the Union Church and Burial Ground that is located right next door on the same property. This sleepy little town was once a bustling manufacturing site with the sawmill and Ghrist around the corner and the Welsh Farms Ice Cream factory up the street from the site.

The Union Schoolhouse Museum at 6 Fairview Avenue

The museum, which was once the town’s schoolhouse, is an engaging site that showcases how the town developed over the last two hundred years. On the…

View original post 1,355 more words

Silas Riggs Saltbox House/Roxbury Township Historical Society 213 Main Street Ledgewood, NJ 07852

Don’t miss the homey atmosphere of the Salis Riggs Saltbox House and a step back into a simpler time.

The Silas Riggs Saltbox House is a beautifully decorated home and so welcoming in the early spring.

The Riggs House kitchen which was a place of good food and many past conversations and where their Christmas fundraiser is held.

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Silas Riggs Saltbox House/Roxbury Township Historical Society

213 Main Street

Ledgewood, NJ 07852

(973) 927-7603

http://www.roxburynewjersey.com/society.htm

Open: Check their Website/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

I visited the Silas Riggs Saltbox House on a visit to the Roxbury Township Historical Society during the Morris County’s “Pathways to History” event. The event gave us a chance to visit many different sites in one day.

The Historical marker in front of the house

The Silas Riggs Saltbox House is part of the King Victorian Home & King Canal Store complex it shares with the Roxbury Historic Trust. The Silas Riggs home is a preserved colonial era, Revolutionary War period residence. It is managed by the Roxbury Township Historical Society as a “Living History Museum”, hosting events that bring a sense of the past to those who step inside (Roxbury Historical Society).

The Silas Riggs Saltbox House during the tour

The last historical site…

View original post 771 more words

Obadiah La Tourette Grist and Sawmill/Washington Township Land Trust 12 East Mill Road Long Valley, NJ 07853

Don’t miss the Abadiah La Tourette Ghirst & Sawmill for a glimpse into New Jersey’s manufacturing past.

Mother Nature still powers this site

The Obadiah La Tourette Ghrist & Sawmill in Long Valley, NJ

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Obadiah La Tourette Grist and Sawmill/Washington Township Land Trust

12 East Mill Road

Long Valley, NJ 07853

(908) 876-5986

https://www.njskylands.com/hsmillob

Open: See their website/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

Video on the Obadiah La Tourette Grist & Sawmill

I visited the Obadiah La Tourette Grist & Sawmill during a visit to Long Valley, NJ for Morris County’s “Pathway to History” tour and this was one of the most unusual and interesting sites on the tour. The mill was once one of the most active businesses in the area. The Mill processed and packaged flour for the areas farmers making it one of the most profitable businesses in the region. By the end of WWII, the Mill was itself was becoming antiquated and larger producers could make the product for far less money and the business closed.

The Obadiah La Tourette Mill

The entrance of the…

View original post 624 more words

King Victorian Home & King Canal Store/Roxbury Historic Trust 209 & 211 Main Street Ledgewood, NJ 07852

Don’t miss this interesting historic site in Ledgewood, NJ on early New Jersey Commerce. This is an important part of the Morris Canal commerce.

The King Canal Store Museum at 209 Main Street in Ledgewood, NJ.

The King Family Homestead at 211 Main Street in Ledgewood, NJ

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

King Victorian Home & King Canal Store/Roxbury Historic Trust

209 & 211 Main Street

Ledgewood, NJ 07852

(973) 927-7603/(973) 584-7903

http://www.roxburynewjersey.com/trust-home.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Store_and_Homestead

Open: Check their website/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46563-d15096918-Reviews-King_House_And_Stores_Museum-Ledgewood_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html

The King Canal Store Museum at 209 Main Street

I visited the King Canal Store Museum and the King Homestead during the Morris County “Pathways to History” tour in May of 2022. This interesting store was still intact with its merchandise lining the shelves with a pot belly stove in the center of the store which was the center of action when the store was open to the community. All sorts of grocery items and notion items still line the walls.

The inside of the King Canal Store Museum shows the center of the community

The guide explained that upon the death of the owner wanted to store closed and sealed. His daughter only opened it in the 1930’s…

View original post 592 more words

Day Two Hundred and Thirty-Four- Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. presents: “Rocking it in Rutherford, NJ: Be a Tourist in your own Town” April 28th, 2022

The students of my Business 101 class keep dazzling me!

The Creation of the Case Study Project “Rocking it in Rutherford: Being a tourist in your own Town”:

I have been teaching “Introduction to Business 101” at Bergen Community College for several years now and in the era of COVID, it has been especially difficult. With businesses shutting down never to reopen getting students to understand that business must go on and pivot is a difficult thing to do. You have to learn to adapt and survive or else everything fails.

This is happening in small downtowns all over the country. You have to learn to adapt, or you will fail. Things have gotten better though with the dropping of the mask mandates and businesses opening up.

In my live classes, I open my consulting company, “Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.”, for business and the whole class bands together and we have one big project. In the era of COVID and online learning, I was lucky that I was able to teach one of the live classes on the Bergen Community College, Paramus Campus. It was such a pleasure welcoming students back to campus with live lectures and conversing with them.

The Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. corporate logo of the six trees

https://bcpccom.wordpress.com/contact/

In the past, I have created these projects under the Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. banner, the main consulting company, the Orion Malls banner, a Mall design company and the Buscomonzefi.com banner, my Tech Division. Each business does its best to be creative, forward thinking and have a thought producing presentations. I also challenge the students to top on another in their presentations and build on what they have seen others do in the past.

Professor Justin Watrel, CEO & Co-Founder of Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.

This semester’s project “Rocking it in Rutherford: Being a Tourist in your own Town” was inspired by the success of the “Take me back to Paterson, NJ” project in 2019. I loved how the students really had to learn about the history of the City of Paterson and about New Jersey history in general. This is something not being taught in schools today.

The blog on Day One Hundred and Fifty-Five: “Take me back to Paterson, NJ” in 2019:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/11226

I chose Rutherford because it was the next town over from the Lyndhurst campus where I was teaching and the fact that Lyndhurst did not have a cohesive downtown area to promote. When I walked it, their downtown was in sections instead of one long stretch. Also, Downtown Rutherford had more of a history to it and was picturesque with its old buildings, classic look of an old church dominating the downtown and a park with a band shell at the top of the shopping district. There was more you could do with it.

The town is on two major bus routes one into New York City and one into Newark as well as being a railroad head for New York City. The town has become more desirable for people moving out of New York City for more open space, better schools and the amenities that come with living in the suburbs. They still want a ‘citified’ atmosphere though with good restaurants, clean safe parks to relax in and a strollable downtown with lots to offer for both shopping and eating. Rutherford has all of these.

I assembled the project together in two days after walking the downtown several times getting inspiration of how to market it and ideas that I had seen in the past in other towns of what they run at various times of the year drawing ideas from towns in the Hudson River Valley.

I entitled the project “Rocking it in Rutherford: Being a tourist in your own Town”, a creative approach to market the downtown for tourists to come visit from all over New Jersey and New York especially the City, the way Rhinebeck and Beacon do for dining, shopping and special events like “First Monday’s” and “Sinterklaas”.

The second week back from the Spring Break I presented the project and handed out the positions of the company and then explained the project. I go the usual ‘Yeahs’ and ‘groans’ from the students. I also got those panicked looks from the students who looked at me like they could never handle their position in the company. I would like to think as a CEO, I know them better than they know myself. After that, I had the Teams break up into their groups, met with my Executive Team and then met with the President and Senior Vice-President of Operations before they left for the night. It is always an interesting experience when meeting your Executive Team for the first time. They look nervous about being in charge.

The Project “Rocking it in Rutherford: Being a Tourist in your own Town”:

The accompanying papers that the students worked on to support the project:

This all changes over the next few weeks as the students start up group chats and meet with one another after class. Then it was time to take the students out “into the field”. Right before COVID hit, I was going to take my class who were creating the project “From Revolution to Revelation-Visiting Historic Bergen County, NJ” out to visit historical sites, museums and farms all over the county. Then the virus hit, and we could not do any of that. I had seen how successful these field trips had been just by visiting our own campus or our trip to Downtown Paterson, NJ. I had to help the students overcome their fear of that city and see it gems and benefits.

I arranged for the students to take a field trip to Downtown Rutherford, NJ one night of class three weeks after the Spring Break. Of course, it has been raining the whole week and I asked the students in advance if they wanted to take the field trip even if there was a chance of rain. My Senior VP of Operations emailed me and said that people did not have a problem with it. It was the most rainy, miserable night to walk around a town!

We all met in class where I gave my speech about behaving themselves on a field trip and how they are representing Bergen Community College. That always helps. Then the heavens opened up on our way to the first stop, the First Presbyterian Church of Rutherford, an elegant church at the top of the downtown that was going to serve as the location for the “Snowflake Festival”.

The First Presbyterian Church of Rutherford at 1 East Passaic Avenue

http://fpcrutherford.org/

The church was an example of Victorian architecture not seen today

I could not believe how beautiful this church was with it wooden carved benches, Tiffany windows and elegant pews. The whole church was done in carved wood and since it had an endowment to keep it up, the church was immaculate. It was one of those churches that you want to attend during the holidays to enjoy the pipe music and flowers. It also had lots of meeting spaces that were perfect for the project. I could tell that the students were impressed.

The inside the First Presbyterian Church of Rutherford is so elegant

After we left the tour of the church, we had to endure the elements and walk to Lincoln Park across the street to view the band shell for the “Big Band” concerts that we would be holding there in the month of August. I could not believe that most of the students were not carrying umbrellas (this is after I told them all to bring an umbrella with them twice). The rain was really coming down at that point.

We walked the park and I showed them how we could set the whole thing up and how operations could work. We could even use the meeting rooms at the church and their kitchen to cook the refreshments for the concerts. While we were finishing, one of the students snapped a group shot of us at the band shell.

My class at the Band Shell in Lincoln Park in Rutherford, NJ on that rainy night

After the tour of the band shell, we walked the entire side of the downtown going south with me pointing out historical points like the WWII Memorial at the circle and historic businesses like Varrelman’s Bake Shop at 60 Park Avenue (it was closed at this point of the evening). We then stopped at the railroad station and talked for a bit where there was a covering from the rain.

I explained how people could come into town by both rail and by bus where they did not need a car. This way people from other parts of New Jersey could join in the fun without having to look for parking.

Then we walked north up the other side of Park Avenue to our final destination, dinner at Da Mario Pizza at 25 Park Avenue for dinner. I had planned a pizza dinner for my class (which I pay for) which is a Team building event and also gives the students a chance to bond as a group. Plus, I feed them and on this gloomy night, they deserved it.

Da Mario Pizza at 25 Park Avenue

http://www.damariospizza.com/

https://m.facebook.com/DA-Mario-Pizzeria-307412312621040/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46796-d4960770-Reviews-Da_Mario_Pizzeria-Rutherford_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

I ordered five large cheese pizzas and then let the students pick their beverages. I gave a little speech about the town and then about the project. We would be having another series of field trips to other places in town over the next few weeks while they worked on their project. They would also have to take trips to the town on their own. After that, I let the groups get together and work on their game plans for the project.

It was nice to just get out of the rain. I was hoping by the time we got out of the restaurant that the rain would stop. It poured more! After dinner, the Teams walked to the Williams Center to see the complex and I explained what would be happening in the future to the site with a new condo building and parking garage. It would bring more people to the downtown creating a new base of customers to the businesses downtown. Then I let them go home. It was a wet evening.

“Welcome to Rutherford” video promoting the attributes of the town

Over the next two weeks, there were two extra credit trips, one to the Meadowlands Museum on a Saturday so that the students could see the museum with time to visit all the exhibitions. The other trip was to City Hall for a Council Meeting to meet the Mayor and the Borough Council. Those were eye openers for not just the students but myself as well. These were the trips that I was to take with my students two years earlier to promote their projects before COVID shut us down. I could imagine the extra work that could have been done on those projects if the virus had not come.

I was able to arrange with the Meadowlands Museum, a small historical museum in Rutherford that concentrates on both the town and the County’s history from the Native Americans to the rise of the agriculture industry in Bergen County. I lead my class on a tour before class one Thursday evening and it was an eye-opener to students who lived nearby and never knew the museum existed.

The Meadowlands Museum at 91 Crane Avenue

https://www.meadowlandsmuseum.com/

https://www.facebook.com/MMusRutherford/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meadowlands_Museum

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46796-d2403380-Reviews-Meadowlands_Museum-Rutherford_New_Jersey.html

The video promoting The Meadowlands Museum

We toured the first floor with its local art exhibition, communications display and section dedicated to a local doctor. Then to the second floor where children’s toys were located, the mining exhibition and a display of glowing minerals to show off New Jersey’s Mining past. Then it was to the basement level where spinning wheels, farm equipment and a turn of the last century kitchen was displayed. Some of the students had never seen displays like this before. After the tour, it was back to class for their quiz and lecture.

My class touring the Meadowlands Museum during class time

For the next three weeks, I gave the students class time to work with their Teams on the project and then on their own they revisited the town, created their commercials and put together their presentations.

The Historical tour of Rutherford, NJ brought to YouTube

On the night of April 28th, 2022, the students dressed in professional dress and presented their project to the Honorable Mayor Frank Nunziato and the Rutherford Borough Council. This is when I present a group of Generation Z students as Generation X consultants, and they are the executives of Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.

Each group presented their part of the presentation to our invited guests and creatively introduced their section of the project. I could not have been prouder.

The PowerPoint Presentation of “Rocking it in Rutherford: Being a Tourist in your own Town”:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/17B5u2ZyB_CwSLf68qi4hHOqr8110-ULQdIS5F_NHYuE/edit?usp=gmail

These videos of the presentation are available on YouTube:

The Introduction and the Talent Team:

My Introduction of the Project and the Talent Team Presentation

The Historical Team Presentation:

The Historical Team describes their ideas for the Historical Tour and updates at the Meadowland Museum

The Marketing Team Presentation:

The Marketing Team presented their ideas for Special Events and Advertising plus the new town song “Rutherford 07070”.

When the presentation was over, I could see that the Mayor and the Council as well as the Vice-President of the Chamber of Commerce were blown away by the whole presentation. They were so impressed by the work that the student consultants did on the project.

Everyone had such great questions for the student consultants, and they were up for the challenge. I even had our Team Leader sing “Rutherford 07070” live to the Mayor and his Team and everyone enjoyed that.

The song “Rutherford 07070”

Each of the Council men and women got up and talked with each Team on their ideas and were very impressed by the thoroughness of the budgets and the realistic numbers that they presented. They even noted the student’s followed things like budgeting for the police and DPW for the Special Events. They also liked that everyone from locating our offices in the Rutherford area to using downtown restaurants for catering and for our company “Wrap Up” party. Everyone got a chance to give the student consultants their input on the project.

After the presentation, the Mayor and the Council along with the Vice-President of the Rutherford Chamber of Commerce took a group shot with my class and that meant a lot to me. It showed both myself and the students that they took the presentation seriously.

My Business 101 student consultants with the Mayor and Council and Chamber of Commerce of Rutherford, NJ

After the presentation was over, I had a light reception for the students, their families and our invited guests. It was a nice evening, and I was so proud of my students. It was another group that has now entered to the Alumni of “Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.” (Acronym for Bergen Community College-Paramus Campus).

I went to Heights Bar & Grill that evening to celebrate their success. It had been a long semester in the post-COVID era. We overcame the difficulties with masks and stress and achieved the goal! This is when a thin-crusted pizza and a drink taste even better.

.

Heights Bar & Grill at 163 Boulevard

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46497-d4734828-Reviews-The_Heights_Bar_and_Grill-Hasbrouck_Heights_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Please see the whole project on the new “Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.” website:

The website for the Lyndhurst Team for “Rocking it in Rutherford: Being a Tourist in your own Town”:

http://mgutierrez144070.wordpress.com/

The PowerPoint for the presentation:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/17B5u2ZyB_CwSLf68qi4hHOqr8110-ULQdIS5F_NHYuE/edit?usp=gmail

Florham Park Historic Preservation Commission/Little Red Schoolhouse & Hancock Cemetery 203 Ridgedale Avenue Florham Park, NJ 07932

Don’t miss the “Pathways to History” event each May in Morris County, NJ. You can see a lot of the county’s historical sites in a two-day period.

The Florham Park Historical Society’s “Little Red Schoolhouse” Museum is full of artifacts of the town’s rural past. There is even a small classroom set up to show children that times have not changed that much.

The classroom set up is still similar modern classrooms

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Florham Park Historic Preservation Commission/Little Red Schoolhouse & Hancock Cemetery

203 Ridgedale Avenue

Florham Park, NJ 07932

(973) 267-3465

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Community-Organization/Little-Red-Schoolhouse-438800069660078/

Open: See Website/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

The Little Red Schoolhouse Museum

I visited the “Little Red Schoolhouse” Museum in Florham Park as part of the Morris County’s “Pathways to History” event that is held every May. This interesting little museum showcases the town’s historical collection of items from the 1800’s and 1900’s dealing with all aspects of town life.

In the back there is a small classroom set up keeping with the theme of the building. This lets students who are visiting the building of their counterpart’s early education with desks, ink wells and chalk boards that have not changed that much over the years.

Not much has changed in the modern classroom over the years

There is early…

View original post 593 more words

Chester Historical Society/Chester’s Rockefeller Center 137 Main Street Chester, NJ 07630

The Chester Historical Society is currently being renovated and is only open for special events.

The Chester Historical Society is still being renovated but is open for special events like Morris County, NJ’s “Pathway to History” event.

The museum is being renovating for the future.

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Chester Historical Society/Chester’s Rockefeller Center

137 Main Street

Chester, NJ 07630

(973) 829-8120/(908) 879-2761

http://www.historicchesternj.com/

Open: Check their website/Seasonal

Admission:

My review on TripAdvisor:

The Chester Historical Society/Chester Rockefeller Center has just been moved to Downtown Chester and is currently being renovated. Their collection is in storage right now while the building is being renovated. When I went to visit the museum, they were displaying their plans for the museum in the future outside the building.

The Chester Historical Society is currently open only at certain times and the collection is in storage while renovating. They are telling the town’s story on both a story board outside and on tables outside the building while it is being set up. Please check out their website for upcoming events and openings.

The new building

The Chester Historical Society is now in the process of being renovating and is empty accept when it…

View original post 374 more words