Category Archives: Exploring Historic Towns in New Jersey

Obadiah La Tourette Grist and Sawmill/Washington Township Land Trust 12 East Mill Road Long Valley, NJ 07853

Don’t miss the Abadiah La Tourette Ghirst & Sawmill for a glimpse into New Jersey’s manufacturing past.

Mother Nature still powers this site

The Obadiah La Tourette Ghrist & Sawmill in Long Valley, NJ

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Obadiah La Tourette Grist and Sawmill/Washington Township Land Trust

12 East Mill Road

Long Valley, NJ 07853

(908) 876-5986

https://www.njskylands.com/hsmillob

Open: See their website/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

Video on the Obadiah La Tourette Grist & Sawmill

I visited the Obadiah La Tourette Grist & Sawmill during a visit to Long Valley, NJ for Morris County’s “Pathway to History” tour and this was one of the most unusual and interesting sites on the tour. The mill was once one of the most active businesses in the area. The Mill processed and packaged flour for the areas farmers making it one of the most profitable businesses in the region. By the end of WWII, the Mill was itself was becoming antiquated and larger producers could make the product for far less money and the business closed.

The Obadiah La Tourette Mill

The entrance of the…

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King Victorian Home & King Canal Store/Roxbury Historic Trust 209 & 211 Main Street Ledgewood, NJ 07852

Don’t miss this interesting historic site in Ledgewood, NJ on early New Jersey Commerce. This is an important part of the Morris Canal commerce.

The King Canal Store Museum at 209 Main Street in Ledgewood, NJ.

The King Family Homestead at 211 Main Street in Ledgewood, NJ

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

King Victorian Home & King Canal Store/Roxbury Historic Trust

209 & 211 Main Street

Ledgewood, NJ 07852

(973) 927-7603/(973) 584-7903

http://www.roxburynewjersey.com/trust-home.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Store_and_Homestead

Open: Check their website/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46563-d15096918-Reviews-King_House_And_Stores_Museum-Ledgewood_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html

The King Canal Store Museum at 209 Main Street

I visited the King Canal Store Museum and the King Homestead during the Morris County “Pathways to History” tour in May of 2022. This interesting store was still intact with its merchandise lining the shelves with a pot belly stove in the center of the store which was the center of action when the store was open to the community. All sorts of grocery items and notion items still line the walls.

The inside of the King Canal Store Museum shows the center of the community

The guide explained that upon the death of the owner wanted to store closed and sealed. His daughter only opened it in the 1930’s…

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Florham Park Historic Preservation Commission/Little Red Schoolhouse & Hancock Cemetery 203 Ridgedale Avenue Florham Park, NJ 07932

Don’t miss the “Pathways to History” event each May in Morris County, NJ. You can see a lot of the county’s historical sites in a two-day period.

The Florham Park Historical Society’s “Little Red Schoolhouse” Museum is full of artifacts of the town’s rural past. There is even a small classroom set up to show children that times have not changed that much.

The classroom set up is still similar modern classrooms

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Florham Park Historic Preservation Commission/Little Red Schoolhouse & Hancock Cemetery

203 Ridgedale Avenue

Florham Park, NJ 07932

(973) 267-3465

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Community-Organization/Little-Red-Schoolhouse-438800069660078/

Open: See Website/Seasonal

My review on TripAdvisor:

The Little Red Schoolhouse Museum

I visited the “Little Red Schoolhouse” Museum in Florham Park as part of the Morris County’s “Pathways to History” event that is held every May. This interesting little museum showcases the town’s historical collection of items from the 1800’s and 1900’s dealing with all aspects of town life.

In the back there is a small classroom set up keeping with the theme of the building. This lets students who are visiting the building of their counterpart’s early education with desks, ink wells and chalk boards that have not changed that much over the years.

Not much has changed in the modern classroom over the years

There is early…

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Day Two Hundred and Twenty-Five The Hasbrouck Heights Men’s Association ‘Man of the Year Awards’ March 16th, 2022

The Hasbrouck Heights Men’s Association 2022 “Man of the Year” Annual Dinner March 25th, 2022

Hasbrouck Heights Men’s Association honors their “Men of the Year”

On Friday, March 25th, the Hasbrouck Heights Men’s Association held their annual dinner for their members and their spouses. We chose Roma’s in North Arlington as it held a lot of good memories for the organization. We had held our 2019 dinner here right before everything closed due to the pandemic which had been another memorable night for the organization. Their food and service are excellent and the membership enjoyed a wonderful dinner.

Before dessert was served, President Steve Palladino gave a warm welcome to everyone. We talked about the successes we had in the previous year with our Golf Outing being one of the most prosperous in recent history and one of the best Christmas tree sales for the association. We sold a record number of trees in eleven days that generated a great profit for our scholarship fund.

The Executive Board presented our awards for “Volunteer of the Year” award for the member whose contributions over the last year made the association flourish. The Executive Board chose Mark Stefanelli, whose fundraising for our Annual Golf Outing made it the success it was this year. He really reached out to the community for sponsorship that raised a lot of money for the event and helped raise some of the biggest donations to make the Golf Outing the huge success that it was last year.

Executive Board Members Lou Verdi, Ken Wheeler, Winner Mark Stefanelli, Steve Palladino, Dennis Colton and Justin Watrel

Our “Man of the Year”, a man that honors the Hasbrouck Heights community with their dedication to the town, was resident and volunteer Tony Bonelli. Mr. Bonelli was an athlete at Hasbrouck Heights High School who not only led the school to many winning seasons but played multiple sports while attending.

Executive Board members Lou Verdi, Ken Wheeler, Steve Paladino, winner Tony Bonelli, Dennis Colton and Justin Watrel

He has for the last forty years helped in the Recreation Department, coaching teams, assisting in the grounds upkeep and when he got older contributed by assisting other coaches and lending his support to many of our town’s youth teams.

“Man of the Year” winner Tony Bonelli with his family at the HHMA Dinner

Both men have contributed a lot not just to making us a better organization but making Hasbrouck Heights the community that it is today.

Thank you to all the members who contribute so much over the previous years.

Members of the Hasbrouck Heights Men’s Association having dinner

Roma’s

33 Crystal Street

North Arlington, NJ 07031

(201) 991-2550

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Italian-Restaurant/Roma-Ristorante-177019613883/

Open: Sunday 12:00pm-8:00pm/Monday-Tuesday Closed/Wednesday-Saturday 12:00pm-10:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46678-d459554-Reviews-Roma_Restaurant-North_Arlington_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Turtle Back Zoo 500 Northfield Avenue West Orange, NJ 07052

Exploring zoos in the wintertime gives a perspective on climate changes on animals and how they have to adapt. It was a fun visit for Groundhogs Day.

Don’t miss visiting Miss “Edwina of Essex” next year at the Groundhog’s Day festivities. She will be the star of the show.

Visiting a Museum: The Unique, Unusual, Obscure and Historical

Turtle Back Zoo

500 Northfield Avenue

West Orange, NJ 07052

(973) 731-5800

https://www.facebook.com/TurtleBackZoo/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtle_Back_Zoo

Open: Sunday-Saturday 10:00am-3:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60796-d1448643-Reviews-Turtle_Back_Zoo-West_Orange_New_Jersey.html

I have been coming to the Turtle Back Zoo since I was in elementary school when we used to come here on field trips. I remember as a child having lunch on the lawn with my class and feeding the animals. That was back in the 1970’s with the old zoo set up. I had read that the zoo was falling apart by 1995 and they were ready to close it down. Like anything else, these zoos and parks need an update every few years to keep them relevant.

In 2000, as master plan was started in what direction the zoo wanted to go and in the next twenty years, I have seen the results of that hard work. You have many nicer displays, some still being too…

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The Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. Team at Paterson City Hall

Day One Hundred and Fifty-Five: Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. presents “Take me Back to Paterson, New Jersey” Introduction to Business 101-Bergen Community College November 23rd, 2019

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.

Bergecco-Parc Logo

Welcome to Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. from Professor Justin Watrel, CEO & Co-Founder:

“This is the second time I have opened the firm, Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc., for my Introduction to Business 101 class. As a College Professor, I have always felt that the only way that the students are going  to learn is by doing the work in real life.  So every semester we do a group project that encompasses everything we are learning in the text book. The entire class becomes members of the Paramus-branch Team and they have to do a real life project that has to be presented in front of a group. This project took it one step further as the Team was invited to present the project to His Honorable Andre Sayegh, Mayor of Paterson and his Executive Team.”

The website for Bergecco-Parc Consulting Incorporated’s latest project: “Take me back to Paterson, NJ”:

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.

Our Film section of the Proposal:

https://mywalkinmanhattan.com/2019/12/23/bergecco-parc-consulting-inc-film-team-project/

For this semester, I developed something different from the previous projects. I had been in Paterson, NJ visiting some sites for my blog, “VisitingaMuseum.com” that is available on WordPress.com as well, that is an off-shoot of my main blog, “MywalkinManhattan.com”.

https://mywalkinmanhattan.com/

https://visitingamuseum.com/

I had visited the Paterson Museum one afternoon and then walked to the Paterson Falls, which is the second highest Falls east of the Mississippi. Along the way I had a hot dog and fries at Libby’s Lunch, a restaurant that has been in Paterson since 1936 (See my review on TripAdvisor).  While I was walking around the Falls after lunch and admiring them for all directions, I wondered why people don’t come down and visit them.

Paterson, NJ does not have the best reputation in the State of New Jersey. The schools, the gang problems and the poverty rate does not add to the reputation of a city that has been left behind. It was once the shopping and entertainment mecca from the end of the Second World War until the riots of 1967. ‘White flight’ and the closing of manufacturing plants sealed the fate of the city and the 1991 fire of Meyer Brothers Department Store in the downtown area just personified the problems of the City.

Yet I still saw something there. There is a lot of beauty to the City. Walking from the Falls back to the Paterson Museum I decided to find Lou Costello Park, a small square that is dedicated to the Comedian Lou Costello of the comedy team of Abbott & Costello. This small park just down the street from the Falls and was weed investing and full of homeless people. It was a little scary walking through the park, more for the homeless than for me as they thought I was a undercover policeman.

Walking down the street from the park leads to “Little Lima” the home of one of the largest population of Peruvian-Americans in the county. This vibrant neighborhood contains restaurants, retail stores, bakeries and salons and there is a lot to offer. This was once home to a large Irish population who used to work in the Mills and then it was Paterson’s Italian “Little Italy” until about the 70’s when most families moved to the suburbs.

I stopped in Los Immortales at 21 Market Street, a deli/bakery (see review on TripAdvisor) for a snack. They had the most delicious dulce de leche doughnuts, filled with a kind of caramel tasting sweetened milk filling. They also had delicious pastilitos, similar to empanadas, a pastry filled with beef or chicken.

On another trip I made to the City later that week to finalize the field trip, I ate at Central City Pizza at 301 Main Street (see my review on TripAdvisor). Their pizza was amazing for a small pizzeria. The slices were huge, the pizza sauce amazing and at $2.00 a slice was well within budget.

All of these sites were only within a few blocks of one another. As I was walking back to the car at the museum, it dawned on me why people were not coming here with these free cultural sites and reasonable meals. This is where the idea for marketing Paterson, NJ for tourism came about.

This semester I wanted to introduce my business students to the concept of marketing and using their business tools from class to see the same vision of the City that I was seeing. So I presented the project, “Take me back to Paterson, NJ”, to the class. How could we take the second largest City in New Jersey, one that was surround by some of the wealthiest suburbs and make it a destination to travel to for entertainment?

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. Paterson Logo I

Our logo promoting the City of Paterson, NJ

What I like about working with students in the entry level classes is their eagerness to look at things in a new light and their ambition to push themselves on their own. When I set the Executive Team up, it was interesting to see how they all come together. It takes time but I always see new relationships and friendships come out of it.

It was a slow start on the project as the students had to get to know their groups and the trust factors start. I saw the project start to jell when I arranged a trip ‘into the field’ to Paterson, NJ after our Midterm exam. I was surprised how happy some of the students were to go on a field trip. We lucked out and the weather was terrific, warm and sunny, a perfect fall day. The interesting part of this trip I found out later on in their research papers on the project was that many of them were worried about visiting Paterson, NJ. The reputation was already established in their minds and it was my job as their CEO of the company to change it.

As a group, it was an information trip and I could tell really opened the eyes of the students. Not only were they really surprised by what they saw but I liked how they bonded together both over lunch at Libby’s for a hot dog and fries and touring the Falls for a second time.

We started the trip by visiting the Paterson Museum first and meeting the curator and staff. I don’t think the students realized what a rich history Paterson had and the role it played in the history of this country. The Paterson Museum covers from the time of the Lenape Indians when they used this area as a fishing site and for worship to when Alexander Hamilton created the first planned City using the water source as energy and this lead to the creation of the Silk Industry henceforth the nickname “Silk City “.

Paterson Museum.jpg

The Paterson Museum at 2 Market Street

https://www.patersonnj.gov/department/?structureid=16

The Museum covers the history of the City of Paterson including famous individuals such as Lou Costello the Comedian, the growth the aerospace business of Curtis-Wright, the gun manufacturing industry, the silk industry and locomotive industry. There is also displays of minerals from the area as well as art work. Some of the students from our Talent Division had to plan a press party here so they asked lots of questions.

Paterson MuseumII.jpg

The history of ‘Silk City’ at the Paterson Museum

After our tour of the Paterson Museum, we started our first part of the tour of the Paterson Falls before lunch. Since the day got clearer and sunnier, the Falls were in their prime. It was just beautiful to enter the Paterson Falls National Park.

Paterson Great Falls.jpg

The Paterson Great Falls in the Great Falls District of the City of Paterson at 72 McBride Avenue

https://www.nps.gov/pagr/index.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Falls_(Passaic_River)

This is where the students were able to capture of the real beauty of the City. The Falls were just beautiful with all the leaves changing colors behind them. We saw the entrance to the park for a quick explanation of the Falls and how they developed and how the Indians used this area as their summer camp.

Paterson Falls III.jpg

The Paterson Falls

Before we took a full tour of the Falls, I took the students to Libby’s Lunch at 98 McBride Avenue (See review on TripAdvisor-Closed in 2020), a small diner restaurant that has been by the Falls since 1936. We had a group lunch of hot dogs and French fries (some of the students had turkey burgers) and Cokes. This is where I really saw my students bond. There was a lot of laughing and talking around the table and I could see that everyone was having a good time. The service could not have been nicer and more friendly and our waitress handled this large crowd well.

Libby's lunch

Libby’s Lunch in Paterson, NJ at 98 McBride Avenue (Closed in 2020)

https://patersontimes.com/2020/07/20/iconic-paterson-eatery-libbys-is-closing-after-more-than-80-years/

After lunch, some of the students had to leave for work and other classes (they would return later for future visits) and the rest of the class and I continued on with our tour of the falls. We walked from the restaurant to the top part of the river and walked over the bridge covering the Falls and then we walked over the Falls. That’s when I knew I had their attention. The Falls are just so majestic and natural that when you hear the roar of the Falls it is enjoyable.

Libby's Lunch II

The hot dogs and fries were terrific

I gave the students about twenty minutes to walk around the park and just admire the view. I could see that many of the them were captured by the beauty of the park and after walking all over the park, some of them met on the benches below and just talked. it was nice to see that they were getting along so well.

Our next stop was Lou Costello Park, a tiny triangle of land down the block from the Falls and into the Mill district. This small park was dedicated to the famous comedian is located just behind the ‘Little Lima’ neighborhood District just off Ellison Street.

Lou Costello Park

Lou Costello Park on Van Houten Street

https://www.patersonnj.gov/egov/apps/locations/facilities.egov?view=detail&id=9

It is a sad reminder of the famous comedian. The park was falling apart and I had to warn the students of the homeless who took up residence here. For the most part, our group seemed to scare away everyone and we were able to walk the whole park with no problems. The statue could have used a good sandblasting and the lawn a good mowing and trimming but overall it was a good tour. There were not a lot of homeless that day in the bandstand.

Our next part of the tour was to “Little Lima’, the Peruvian-American district of shops, bakeries and restaurants that is tucked between Downtown Paterson and the Paterson Museum. Little Lima is between Main Street, Spruce Street, McBride Avenue, Cianci Street and Ward and Olive Streets. The border is with the Paterson Museum.

Little Lima II.jpg

Walking in Little Lima, Paterson, NJ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Lima

We walked all the streets in the neighborhood and on the edge of Downtown Paterson, where I showed the students all the Beaux-Arts buildings that once made up all the upscale department and specialty stores, office buildings and hotels. The one thing our little group did was shock all the merchants and patrons who looked at us like “Oh, no gentrifiers!” If I saw a mixed combination of students and a professor walking through my neighborhood, I would think the same thing.

We walked all the side blocks so that I could show them the businesses that were open and the condition of the neighborhood. We walked all around the church area and parking lot for a view of where we could hold events. Then I took them to Los Immortales at 21 Market Street (see my review on TripAdvisor) for dessert. We had the most delicious doughnuts filled with dulce de leche that I had eaten a few weeks before and cookies filled with the same. Each of the students took time to walk in and check out the store. Some even bought pastiletos, a type of empanada even after the big lunch. We really wiped out their baked goods. The staff got a kick out of it.

Little Lima.jpg

Los Immortales at 21 Market Street in Paterson, NJ

https://www.restaurantji.com/nj/paterson/los-immortales-/

We walked back to the Paterson Museum and ate our dessert outside on the benches. We discussed the day and then the next group of students had to leave for classes and work and the last group of us headed to Lambert Castle.

Lambert Castle is located away from the downtown and we had to go to Garret Mountain Reserve Park to visit the former mansion of silk baron,  Catholina Lambert. The home was closed as it was getting ready for the annual bazaar and then after the holidays it would close for a five-year renovation.

Lambert Castle

Lambert Castle at 3 Valley Road in Paterson, NJ

https://lambertcastle.org/castle/

We got to walk the grounds and admire the castle with its spectacular views of Paterson and New York City plus the glorious foliage that surrounded the house and the hillside. We got to walk the fountains and walkways around the house and discussed how this could be used for parties and get togethers. From there, we finished our visit and now it was up to the students to work their magic.

From that afternoon on until the presentation on November 22nd, we met at the end of class to have Board Meetings and group discussions on our progress.  Some of groups gelled better than others and with each class that I have done this there are always the ones who think they don’t have to do anything. They always stand out in the crowd.

Then there was a weird twist to the project. I stopped in City Hall in Paterson to see the Mayor and drop off a copy of the project to see if he and the Council would come and hear the presentation.  Because of a mix-up in appointments, he thought I was someone else and being in a blue suit I am not sure knew who I was or what I was doing there (the intern who told me to come in was off that day and did not leave the message).

We had a good laugh and I proceeded to tell his Honorable Andre Sayegh about our project for my class. We had a long discussion about what I wanted to do and the things I wanted the students to achieve on the project. He liked the ideas and came up with a better idea then him coming to class (he worked as a college professor as well and his class was right after mine). Why didn’t bring my class to City Hall to meet him? I loved it and told the Mayor I had to check with the school and then with the students but it should not be a problem.

Andre Sayegh.jpg

His Honorable Mayor of Paterson, NJ Andre Sayegh

https://www.patersonnj.gov/department/index.php?structureid=2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andre_Sayegh

The next week after our quiz and then lecture, almost everyone in my class got into their cars and off we went to Paterson City Hall on Market Street for our visit with the Mayor. I will tell you, it was a great meeting. The Mayor Sayegh is so personal and so enthusiastic about building the City of Paterson back to being an entertainment and dining destination that he embraced the project and encouraged all of my students with ideas and questions that we might have on how to bring tourists and surrounding residents back to the City.

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc..jpg

My class and I meeting with His Honorable Mayor Andre Sayegh

With that I invited the Mayor and the Council to come to campus to hear our ‘pitch’ on how to sell the City of Paterson as a destination. He upped it more and asked if we would like to make the presentation in Paterson City Hall the morning of the project.

The class got all excited and high-fived one another. I asked everyone to slow down as permission to do this project would have to come from the Dean’s Office. I just can’t take thirty students to City Hall on a Saturday morning to present a project without permission. So with the help of my Chairman, Dean and the Vice-President of the College, we got the approval to present the project in Paterson City Hall.

I am the first one to say that I was really nervous about the presentation. I had not seen a dry run of it before that day and I found out later in the student’s papers that I read that there was a lot of last minutes preparations for the presentation up to that morning. When we got to City Hall I could see that a lot of students were nervous and when they were giving their presentations there were some that ummed their way through. This was not a problem as when you are giving your first presentation especially in a real life situation, it can be nerve wracking.

Even before the presentation I was giving the students their Dress Code grade. Getting a group of Millennials and Generation Z students to dress like it was the Reagan Administration was a challenge. Some of the men did not own suits or a blue blazer, so I allowed sweaters. Some did not know how to tie a tie but I have to admit they all had shoes that were shined. Still they presented themselves as gentlemen. The ladies were completely professionally dressed in dresses, skirts, blouses and pantsuits.

Still I opened the presentation to the Mayor of who I was as CEO, who we were and the presentation that we were about to give. After that I had the President and the Senior VP of Operations take over and what a job they did. We were working without a screen, monitor or projector that worked (surprising for a City Hall) but our President took full control of the situation and she and the Senior VP can it like pros.

Each team gave their presentation group by group. We started with the Special Events team with a presentation by their VP and her teams. We had the Lambert Castle team, The Paterson Falls Team, The Paterson Museum Team and the Abbott & Costello Film Retrospect Team. Each gave their presentation on how they would promote their areas followed by commercials promoting their section.

The Paterson Falls Team Commercial:

The Paterson Museum Team Commercial:

The Lambert Castle Team Commercial:

Then our Restaurant Team made their presentation promoting “Little Lima” as a dining and entertainment district in the way of the new “Ironbound Section” as in Newark, NJ. Our VP of the Restaurant Division also came with samples of Peruvian cookies for everyone to sample which I thought was a nice touch.

The ‘Little Lima’ Restaurant Team Commercial:

Our VP of Talent & Security and her team gave their presentation on how we were going to pay for the Paramus Division. She and her team gave their report of salaries, benefits and perks of the company. As a progressive and innovative company, Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. wants to keep the employees happy.

The President and Senior VP lastly gave their report on where we would be running the Division from and picked out the location in an office space in Downtown Paterson, NJ right near City Hall where we could work with the Mayor and his team.

When the students finished their presentation, I was floored by the professionalism of the project, the details and just the way the students presented themselves. I swear I thought the whole thing was really real as did the Mayor and his team.

When we opened it up for questions of the Executive Team, I enjoyed hearing how the students could justify their work and research with the field trip and then their own visits to Paterson on their own. Some of the questions got so detailed that I thought they believed this was a presentation by an outside firm. It was a great relief when it was over. The students were happy and the Mayor and his team seemed impressed.

Our last order of business was taking a picture of the Bergecco-Parc Team with the Mayor and his team. That was a thrill for me. You will never know how proud of I was of this group of students (and of all my students who do this project.

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. Paterson Project

The Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc. team Fall 2019 with his Honorable Mayor Andre Sayegh and his Executive Team at Paterson, NJ City Hall November 22, 2019.

Here is the attachment to the Bergecco-Parc Website:

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.

Here is the attachment to the Film Page:

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc Film Team Project

The Presentation was feature in the recent “Inside Edition” of Bergen Community College Number 8:

As the team broke up and I talked with the Mayor, I saw the team leave one by one with new found respect for one another. Frustrations, concerns and last minute details over. Was the presentation 100%? There were some things we needed to work on including some dress-code issues, articulation in speeches and some of the details of the Power Point but this is what a real team faces everyday when they go to work. Who really does the work, who doesn’t, who thinks they can ‘coast by’ and who does the extra mile. I hope they all thought of this by the time we got back to class after the Thanksgiving break.

I said my goodbyes to everyone and had a quick conversation with my President and Senior VP of Operations to tell them how proud I was of the ladies for leading such a good presentation and taking control of the situation with the IT. The only bad part is I never got to taste one of the muffins that the Mayor brought in for the team for breakfast. When I finally left, everything on the breakfast table was gone (more like stripped away).

When I came back from Florida after my break, I called the Mayor to hear his feedback and the best part was he said ‘he would hire us’. That was nice to hear!

If there was ever a Professor that felt prouder of his students it was me!

Professor Justin Watrel, CEO & Co-Founder

Justin Watral

Bergecco-Parc Consulting Inc.

Bergecco-Parc Logo

New Brunswick NJ/Paramus Satellite

Places to Visit in Paterson:

The Paterson Museum

2 Market Street

Paterson, NJ  07501

(973) 321-1260

http://www.thepatersonmuseum.com/

https://www.patersonnj.gov/department/?structureid=16

Open: Sunday & Saturday 12:30pm-4:30pm/Monday Closed/Tuesday-Friday 10:00am-4:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46718-d2704664-Reviews-Paterson_Museum-Paterson_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2757

The Paterson Falls National Park:

72 McBride Avenue Extension

Paterson, NJ  07501

(973) 523-0370

Open: Check the website. It depends on the season

https://www.nps.gov/pagr/index.htm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46718-d2587276-Reviews-Paterson_Great_Falls_National_Historical_Park-Paterson_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2273

Lou Costello Park

50 Ellison Street

Paterson, NJ  07505

https://foursquare.com/v/lou-costello-memorial-park/4bf8421fbb5176b0905d5bb2

Open: During the daytime hours

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46718-d15154382-Reviews-Lou_Costello_Memorial_Park-Paterson_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Lambert Castle

3 Valley Road

Paterson, NJ  07506

(973) 247-0085

Closed for a three year renovation

https://lambertcastle.org/

https://lambertcastleweb.wordpress.com/museum/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46718-d1880569-Reviews-Lambert_Castle-Paterson_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2571

Little Lima Restaurant District

Between McBride Street, Main Street, Olive and Ward Streets

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Lima

Places to eat in Paterson:

Libby’s Lunch (Closed in 2020)

98 McBride Avenue

Paterson, NJ  07501

(973) 278-8718

Open: Sunday-Saturday 10:00am-10:00pm

https://www.facebook.com/OfficialLibbysLunch/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46718-d1133910-Reviews-Libby_s_Lunch-Paterson_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Center City Pizza

301 Main Street

Paterson, NJ  07505

(973) 345-1100

http://centercitypizza.net/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 10:00am-10:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46718-d4715215-Reviews-Center_City_Pizza-Paterson_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Los Immortales

21 Market Street

Paterson, NJ  07501

973-278-1723

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Los-Inmortales/117745918244222

https://www.restaurantji.com/nj/paterson/los-immortales-/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 4:30am-7:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46718-d19284211-Reviews-Los_Immortales-Paterson_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Northwest Bergen History Coalition

Day One Hundred and Nine: Touring the historic homes and museums for the Eighth Annual History Day of the Northwest Bergen History Coalition April 28th, 2018

I put “MywalkinManhattan” on hold for a few days as the local activities in New Jersey started to take up my time. There is so much to see and do as the weather is getting warmer.

The Northwest Bergen History Coalition every year gives people the opportunity to visit almost a dozen different historical sites in the upper part of Bergen County, NJ and take the time to tour and explore all the sites with the help of trained docents and volunteers who take immense pride in showing off their site all for the low price of $10.00 ($15.00 the day of the event). Be prepared to drive though because all the sites can be a distance from one another. Also, have a a game plan because there is no way you can see everything in one day. You will only have from 10:00am-4:00pm so plan to visit the remaining sites at another time.

This year’s theme was “How Immigration & the Railroad Shaped our Towns”, so all the exhibits were on the immigration of the area and how it shaped the individual town’s population.

NW Bergen History Coalition

“The towns in Northwest Bergen County were settled in the 18th Century by immigrants from countries in Europe and Africa. Through the centuries the number of countries grew. Today, we have been enriched by immigrants from all over the world. The railroad came to Northwest Bergen in the mid-19th century, bringing with it jobs, prosperity and immigrants. Come see how immigrants and the railroad helped to define what would become our modern towns of today.” was the prospective of the days event.

Since I had toured most of the historic homes and museums to the south of the region, I planned my day to the northern part of the county. I bought my ticket way in advance at the Ridgewood Schoolhouse Museum (featured on my blog, “VisitingaMuseum@Wordpress.com and reviewed on TripAdvisor) when I was viewing the “Thread of Life” exhibition, which you should not miss that is showing through December of 2018. It explores life of the era’s family life through clothing.

I planned an early morning and started my Saturday at the Majestic Diner  at 1045 Route 17 South in Ramsey, NJ. This way I would be close to my first site, The Old Stone House in Ramsey, NJ. The food at the Majestic Diner I would highly recommend because I really enjoyed my breakfast there.

Majestic Diner

The Majestic Diner at 1045 Route 17 South

http://www.eatmajestic.com/

The diner does all their baking on premise and I had one of their homemade ‘Pop-Tarts’ ($3.75) to start the meal. These freshly baked pastries resemble their commercial counterparts. The outside was a flaky pastry crust with a thick white icing and a powdering of cinnamon and the inside was loaded with a thick layer of a cinnamon mixture. Decadent yes but well worth it. You have to try this version of the sweet treat.

Majestic Diner II

Don’t miss their freshly baked ‘Pop-Tarts”

Breakfast itself match in creativity and quality. I ordered the Brioche French Toast with a side of homemade sausage. The one thing I liked about the Majestic Diner is that the portion sizes are not huge and over-whelming. It was just the right amount for breakfast. The French Toast was made out of brioche and it was perfect (See review on TripAdvisor).

Majestic Diner IV

Their Brioche French Toast is excellent

They cooked it with a crisp outside and soft inside. As I was eating, I saw the omelettes going by and that was for another time. What was nice about breakfast was that it kept me content for the rest of the afternoon. There would be a lot of running around.

Majestic Diner III

The Majestic Diner is a nice place to start your day of touring Bergen County

My first stop was at The Old Stone House at 538 Island Road in Ramsey, NJ (See review on VisitingaMuseum@Wordpress.com). This obscure little Dutch home sits on a bend on a hill hidden by trees off a very busy section of Route 17 South and by looking at it, you never would have guessed that it was once home to a 300 acre farm. This is the oldest building in Ramsey and was built from a combination of rubble stone, clay mortar, chopped straw and hog’s hair. The home dates back to 1740 and is run by the Ramsey Historical Society (RHS).

Old Stone House.jpg

The Old Stone House at 538 Island Road

https://www.revolutionarywarnewjersey.com/new_jersey_revolutionary_war_sites/towns/ramsey_nj_revolutionary_war_sites.htm

The house is credited to being built by members of the Westervelt family for brothers Uriah and Ruloff Westervelt, who leased the land in 1744. There is a feeling that there had been a house on the property at the time they leased the land. The land had been part of the Ramapough Tract for Proprietors. Other members of the Westervelt family are though to have had influence in the building of the house as well maybe back earlier (RHS).

The Ramapough tract situated between the Ramapo Mountains and Saddle River was purchased from the Indians on November 18,1709 and acknowledged by the Indians at Tappan before Cornelius Harring, the Justice of the Peace (RHS).

Ramapough Tract

The Ramapough Tract

The house had been through many owners since and the land around it diminished over time with each owner. In 1950, the building of Route 17 South, made the lot even smaller and destroyed the spring and stream that were once part of the land around the house. Both the Schweizer family and the Labosky families, who were the last two owners of the house, which the Labosky family sold to the state in 1955, operated an antique shop that is now part of the house that faces Route 17 (RHS).

The house is furnished in period furniture and the barn outside is stocked with all sorts of equipment for early Dutch farming from the era. When you tour the house with the historians, they will point out where the fireplaces once were and the original wooden floors that line the house. Upstairs where the bedrooms once were are both Children’s displays of an old schoolhouse and a toy exhibition. In the downstairs area, there are two displays to the War Years and the old antique shop is set up like a general store. The sites next big fundraiser will be the Sinterklaas event in December for a Dutch Christmas.

Old Stone House II.jpg

Old Stone House Barn

My second stop of the historical tour was the Hopper-Goetschius House and Museum at 363 East Saddle River Road in Upper Saddle River, NJ, run by the Upper Saddle River Historical Society (USRHS).  This historic home dates back to 1739 for the original part of the house, which has since been added onto three more times and still kept its historic look even into the 1980’s when the last resident moved out.

Hopper-Goetschius Museum

Hopper-Goetschius House & Garden at 363 East Saddle River Road

https://www.usrhistoricalsociety.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopper-Goetschius_House

The property houses several buildings that were part of the original house like the outhouse, out kitchen and beehive oven. Other historic buildings that were threatened with being knocked down by developers have since been resembled and brought the property that include a woodshed, a tenant house, the Ramsey Sayer House,  a Dutch barn, the Van Riper-Tice Barn and a working blacksmith shop. That part of the property toward the back part of the farmhouse looks like a mini-village and volunteers were working each of the buildings when I was there.

Upper Saddle River Historical Society

One of the buildings on the ground of the Upper Saddle River Historical Society

The Hopper-Goetschius House on the corner of Lake Street and East Saddle River Road dates back to 1739. Built by the Hopper family, it is the oldest remaining house in Upper Saddle River, NJ. The Saddle River Historical Society knew it existed in 1739 because it was recorded in surveyor Charles Clinton’s journal and possibly it is older. It was also marked as the home of Gerrit Hoppa on a rough sheepskin map made about 1713. The Hoppers farmed the land and had a lot of it. The property extended from the Saddle River up the hill almost to Montvale, NJ and up to the East Road in Upper Saddle River (USRHS).

The house underwent several changes in the mid-1800’s. The large central chimney with back to back fireplaces was removed. Probably with more modern forms of heating available, such as wooden stoves, the fireplace seemed a bit old-fashioned and the owners took it out. They wanted to use the entrance hall as a room, so the stairway along the east wall was removed and a central stairway added where the fireplaces had once been. The dormers were added in the Victorian era (USRHS). Don’t miss the secret stairs in the kitchen that lead to the old second floor which houses a few bedrooms. It is one of the unique features of the house.

In 1814, the house became the home of the Reverend Stephen Goetschius of the Old Stone Church. It remained in the Goetschius family for a century and a half, always a place of central importance in town as Stephen Goetschius, the great-great grandson of the Reverend Stephen, served as the borough clerk for over 40 years and conducted his town business from the east room of the house (USRHS).

The house was without running water until Stephen’s death in 1962. Until improvements were made at that time, Stephen’s wife, Lizzie, carried water from the well for washing, cooking and shoveled coal for heat (USRHS).

In 1985, the Hopper-Goetschius House was presented to the Borough of Upper Saddle River by Clinton and Gracie Carlough. Lizzie Goetschius, the last resident of the house was Clint Carlough’s aunt. The house today serves as a museum, run by the Upper Saddle River Historical Society (USRHS) and offers the public historically  related events through out the year (USRHS). Check out their website, http://www.usrhistoricalsociety.org for special events and check out their Annual Harvest Festival in October for a day of fun.

I double backed around the county to the Mahwah Museum at 201 Franklin Turnpike in Mahwah, NJ and the sister museum, The Old Station Museum at 171 Old Station Lane just south of the main museum. What I like about these museums is that it does not take long to tour them and they sponsor interesting exhibitions that feature local history that do not tax you with lengthy displays and loads of reading. They keep everything interesting, factual and get to the point.

Mahwah Museum.jpg

Mahwah Museum at 201 Franklin Turnpike

https://mahwahmuseum.org/

Having been to the Mahwah Museum earlier that month, I wanted to concentrate on The Old Station Museum. This historic train station was built in 1871 and was used for years until the modern station was built. Behind the building, there is a 1929 Erie Line Caboose that you can walk through that shows the life on the railroad and the use of the caboose on a railroad.

Old Station MuseumIII.jpg

The Old Station Museum at 171 Old Station Lane in Mahwah, NJ

https://mahwahmuseum.org/the-old-station-and-caboose-2/

The museum has a interesting collection of items from the Pullman era that includes china and menus. There is a collection of trains and interesting items including maps from the era when Mahwah was major point of the railroad in the area.

The next stop on my journey as I drove south through Bergen County was the Waldwick Signal Tower at 1 Bohnert Place in Waldwick, NJ and the sister museum of the Waldwick Museum of Local History at 4 Hewson Avenue in Waldwick, NJ right by the current train station. These are part of the Waldwick Historical Society (WHS).

Waldwick Signal Tower.jpg

The Waldwick Signal Tower at 1 Bohnert Place

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erie_Railroad_Signal_Tower,_Waldwick_Yard

The Erie Railroad Interlocking Tower “WC” was built in 1890 by the New York Lake Erie and Western Railroad the tower in on the National Register of Historic Places. It is a symbol of the overall impact of the railroad industry on the Waldwick area. The tower is constructed in a Queen Anne style and other than a few minor maintenance shortcuts, the tower looks as it did when constructed nearly 130 years ago (WHS).

The tower still controlled traffic but as the railroads modernized with radio communications, automatic block control and other labor saving ideas the need for the number of towers on the line was reduced until 1986, when most of the towers outside major hub such as Jersey City were closed. During the last few decades, the tower was only manned during the day (WHS).

It is believed that this is the last standing tower of six built to this design. The two closest known examples in the area were in Ramsey, NJ and Suffern, NY, both having been torn down. The tower is named in honor of Harvey Springstead, one of the most famous engineers on the New York Division of the Erie from 1910 until 1929 and a key citizen of Waldwick (WHS).

The downstairs houses a small display of railroad deeds from the various railroads that used to operate in this part of Bergen County and the upstairs has a collection of railroad artifacts as well as pictures of the renovation of the tower.

I did a circle around the tracks and stopped at the Waldwick Museum of Local History at 4 Hewson Avenue which is located in the restored 1887 Waldwick Railroad and opened in 2016. It is part of the Waldwick Community Alliance.

Waldwick Museum of Local History II.jpg

The Waldwick Museum 4 Hewson Street

https://waldwickcommunityalliance.com/waldwick-railroad-museum

The Society was started by member Doug Cowie in 1977 with the purpose to lobby for the placement of the train station on the National Register of Historic Places in order to save it. With the formation of the Society, the station was placed on the registry.

It is noted that these railroad lines are what brought the new population of immigrants to upper Bergen County at the turn of the last century and why these towns had a building boom before and after World War II.

The museum has an interesting exhibition on the immigration to the area due to railroad transportation. There are historical items as furniture and clothing and train memorabilia. The history of the rails is well represented at the museum.  Members of the museum were on hand to give a personal tour.

My last historical place I visited was The Museum at the Station at 176 Rock Road in Glen Rock. The museum is manged by the Glen Rock Historical Society and is housed inside the original 1905 Erie Main Line Train Station on Rock Road.

Museum at the Station.jpg

Museum at the Station at Glen Rock, NJ

https://www.glenrockhistory.org/copy-of-about

The Museum showcases items from Glen Rock’s past with displays that change periodically as well as permanent exhibits on the Erie Railroad and artifacts from Glen Rock’s farming history (BCHS).

When I visited it was at the end of the day so I was the ladies last guest. The members of the Society took me around the museum which has a interesting exhibition on immigration and how it affected Glen Rock and how it grew as a town. Many of the items are historic family items donated member of the Glen Rock community including clothing and furniture. They had the most interesting Victrola with the original records and period clothing. One resident donated an interesting collection of antique toys including many trains.

While in Glen Rock, I visited the famous Glen ‘Rock’, located right off the downtown at the intersection of Rock Road and Doremus Avenue, which the town is named.  The Rock was pulled to the town by the last Ice Age and was a meeting place and marker for the Lenape Indians when they lived in the area. In the Colonial era, it was a meeting place for residents. There have been many legends about the power of the Rock.

Glen Rock Rock.png

Glen Rock ‘Rock’ just off Downtown Glen Rock, NJ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen_Rock,_New_Jersey

Dinner that night was a revisit to Mahwah to have pizza at Kinchley’s Tavern at 586 North Franklin Turnpike in Ramsey, NJ, for one of their thin crusted pizzas (See review on TripAdvisor). This is one of the oldest restaurants in this part of upper Bergen County and has been on my must try list for about two years.

Kinchley's Pizza II

Kinchley’s Tavern at 586 Northern Franklin Turnpike

https://www.facebook.com/kinchleythincrustpizza/

First off, the place is mobbed all the time. I have heard that people swear by their pizza. It is different from the usual Neapolitan pies that I try all over Bergen County. Kinchley’s specializes in thin-crusted pizzas, more of what people would call a ‘bar pizza’.  The 12 inch pizza can be easily eaten by one person if they are hungry and the sausage pizza I ordered was loaded with sweet Italian sausage. One thing Kinchley’s doesn’t do is skimp on the ingredients.

Kinchley's Pizza III

The inside of Kinchley’s is very homey

The pizza was cooked to a crisp consistency and was devoured quickly after a long day of touring. The restaurant is a great family restaurant with a good vibe. It was like going back in time to the 70’s when going out to dinner with your family was a treat and a rite of the summer. I highly recommend a visit there at least once when visiting Bergen County.

Kinchely's Pizza

Kinchley’s Pizza is very good!

Until next year! Don’t miss this event every year in May!

Take a look at their video on the event:

The Northwest Bergen History Coalition:

http://www.nwbergenhistory.org/

https://www.facebook.com/NWBergenHistory/

Places to Visit:

(Please note that most of these historical places are only open at certain times of the year so please visit their websites)

The Old Stone House Museum

The Ramsey Historical Society

538 Island Road

Ramsey, NJ  07446

(201) 327-2655

http://www.RamseyHistorical.org

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46762-d20323524-Reviews-The_Old_Stone_House_Ramsey_Historical_Society-Ramsey_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2026

Hopper-Goetschius House Museum

Upper Saddle River Historical Society

245 Lake Street

Upper Saddle River, NJ  07458

(201) 327-8644

http://www.usrhistoricalsociety.org

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46882-d14048029-Reviews-Hopper_Goetschius_Museum-Upper_Saddle_River_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2030

The Old Station Museum

The Mahwah Museum

171 Old Station Lane

Mahwah, NJ 07430

http://www.mahwahmuseum.org

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46590-d9819566-Reviews-Mahwah_Museum-Mahwah_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/437

Waldwick Signal Tower

1 Bohnert Place

Waldwick, NJ  07463

wctower@optimum.net

http://allaboardwaldwick.org

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46892-d10366154-Reviews-Erie_Railroad_Signal_Tower-Waldwick_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2019

Waldwick Museum of Local History

4 Hewson Avenue

Waldwick, NJ 07463

(201) 873-8919

http://www.WaldwickMuseum.org

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46892-d14049026-Reviews-Waldwick_Museum_of_Local_History-Waldwick_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2015

The Museum at the Station

176 Rock Road

Glen Rock, NJ  07452

(201) 342-3268

http://www.GlenRockHistory.org

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46466-d14048001-Reviews-The_Museum_at_the_Station-Glen_Rock_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2022

Places to Eat:

Majestic Diner

1045 State Route 17

Ramsey, NJ  07446

(201) 962-8750

Eatmajestic@gmail.com

Open: Sunday-Thursday 6:00am-11:00pm/Friday & Saturday 6:00am-12:00am

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46762-d7283920-Reviews-Majestic_Diner-Ramsey_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Kinchley’s Tavern

586 North Franklin Turnpike

Ramsey, NJ  07446

(201) 934-7777

https://www.kinchleyspizza.com/

Open: Sunday 12:00pm-11:00pm/Monday-Thursday 11:00am-12:00pm/Friday 11:00am-1:00pm/Saturday 11:00am-12:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46762-d540429-Reviews-Kinchley_s_Tavern-Ramsey_New_Jersey.html?m=19905