Category Archives: Spanish Restaurants for the budget minded

Milanes Restaurant 168 West 25th Street New York, NY 10001

Don’t miss this wonderful little Dominican restaurant in the middle of the Garment District near FIT.

Dining on a Shoe String in NYC

Milanes Restaurant

168 West 25th Street

New York, NY 10001

(212) 243-9797

Home

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Spanish-Restaurant/Milanes-Spanish-Restaurant-549954651704145/

Open: Sunday Closed/Monday-Saturday 6:30am-6:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d1902938-Reviews-Milanes_Spanish_Restaurant-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Sometimes you just stumble across a restaurant when you are walking down a street that catches your attention. That is how I felt when I was staying in Manhattan for Spring Break from school and was staying at the Sheraton Four Points a few doors down from Milanes Restaurant.

I saw how reasonable the restaurant was and the nice selection of dishes for breakfast and lunch. This Spanish restaurant has a Dominican influence in its cooking from it owners and chefs.

I stopped in for breakfast after seeing the menu and had never had a Dominican Breakfast before. My selection though ended up being very American with me ordering two breakfasts. I had an order of French Toast which was two very thick slices of bread dipped…

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Day Two Hundred and Two: Exploring Downtown Boonton, NJ-A Local Journey August 15th, 2021

It has been a tough summer. I pulled a muscle and it has been hard to do long walks around Manhattan so I kept it to short walks around my neighborhood. As I have improved, I have been able to get more done and have started to drive again. I was able to make the trip to Boonton, NJ for the Bergen County Firemen’s Home Association Barbecue.

The Members of the Bergen County Firemen’s Home Association

https://tbcfha.wordpress.com/

So off I went adjusting the car seat higher with a pillow and an ice pack. It was a short trip with no traffic and the pain has now subsided with more walking. When I arrived at the home for the barbecue, I had to walk around the property to loosen up a bit.

Still it was a marvelous day and the most beautiful weather sunny and clear and 72 degrees. The residents loved being outside to enjoy the fresh air, music and food and the members liked that we still could socially distance and converse with the residents outside as long as there were not too many gathering (we want to keep our retired firefighting brothers safe too). Please check out my blog on the August BCFHA Barbecue:

The Bergen County Firemen’s Home Association August Barbecue at the NJ Firemen’s Home August 15th, 2021:

https://wordpress.com/post/tbcfha.wordpress.com/466

After the barbecue was over, I decided to head back to Downtown Boonton to explore the downtown on a weekend and get some stretching for my legs and back in before the long ride home. Downtown Boonton, which has been discovered by the artists and hipsters is going through a major change as we speak. There is so much to see and do.

Downtown Boonton, New Jersey is showing a new rebirth from the local shops of the past to new restaurants, galleries and shops popping up all over the downtown. Known for the local ironworks that once made this a company town, somehow this small hamlet was discovered by artists and galleries have been popping up on the main street.

What I like about Boonton’s downtown is the diversity of old and new mixed together and that the main street is a sloped and curving so that you can see the remains of the iron works and the park below. The views of the mountains and trees lined valley’s are spectacular in the summer with swaths of green trees all over.

I discovered Downtown Boonton by accident when I decided to drive around when I had time to spare before an event last year. I had read something about the Boonton Historical Society in a magazine (See my review on TripAdvisor and VisitingaMuseum.com). So I visited the Historical Society after our April meeting last year and attending their 2019 Open House for Christmas. That was a nice event with docent tours, light refreshments and musical performances. Since then I have been back a few more times to explore the shopping district.

Downtown Boonton, NJ Main Street

https://www.boonton.org/263/Boonton-Main-Street-Inc

https://www.boontonmainstreet.org/

https://www.facebook.com/BtnMainStreet/

I have started many trips at the Boonton Historical Society located at 210 Main Street. This interesting little museum is a treasure trove of local history with displays on the history of the local Iron Works, the Trolley Car industry and its role in the development of transportation in the area and displays on the history of the local police, fire and local schools. There are also some interesting pictures of the changes in the downtown area. They also run great walking tours.

I have visited the museum during the 2019 Christmas Open House which was an interesting afternoon of Docent tours of the museum’s Trolley and Railroad exhibition memorabilia and then a wonderful concert from a local musician with refreshments following.

In the Summer of 2021, I took a walking tour of the old Iron Works factory with a local historian. We toured all the spots in Grace Lord Park that had been built up to support the factory along with ruins of the old structures of the complex. It was sad that these will be knocked down for a new condo complex (see my review on TripAdvisor and VisitingaMuseum.com).

Boonton Historical Society at 210 Main Street

https://www.boonton.org/268/Boonton-Historical-Society

https://www.facebook.com/groups/BoontonHistoricalSociety/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46315-d19255529-Reviews-Boonton_Historical_Society_and_Museum-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/3595

On my last three trips exploring the downtown, I have been admiring the statues of dogs and cats that line the street and flank all the buildings. The Boonton Arts Creative Placemaking Initiative organization in partnership with Boonton Main Street Inc. has been showcasing artists who have created these works.

The Dog Days of Summer & Some Cool Cats’ is a public art exhibition showcasing artist’s customer designs on life sized statues displayed on the main street. Artists are sponsored by the public. Once the artist received a sponsor, they get the opportunity to bring their design to life. For the duration of the summer, the sculptures will be available for adoption on the Boonton Arts Etsy page. The project has now raised $70,000 for local animal shelters and over $6,000 for local schools (Boonton Arts).

“Dog Days of Summer & Some Cool Cats” outside the Boonton Post Office

https://www.facebook.com/boontondogdays/

Boonton Dog Days of Summer & Some Cool Cats! +Music on Main!

Across the street from the Historical Society at 309 Main Street is Eric’s Jamaican Cuisine which serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. It specializes in roasts, stews, fish dishes and the patties look amazing. The smells of food cooking and spices from the background grill will make your mouth water.

Eric’s Jamaican Cuisine is at 309 Main Street

https://www.facebook.com/EricsJamaican/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d8298067-Reviews-Erics_Jamaican_Cuisine-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

I stopped in on a recent visit and had a Beef and Cheese Jamaican patty ($2.50) and it was delicious. The crust was so light and flaky and had a nice portion of filling inside. The Chicken and Jerk Chicken patties were sold out so I tried one of the Fried Dumplings ($1.00). It was a round deep fried crisp dough that was perfect with a little jam.

The service could not have been nicer and the woman working the counter went over the menu with me. I love the smell of the spices when you enter the restaurant.

The downtown shopping district has an eclectic mix of the restaurants and shops. One of the first places I ate lunch at when I was touring the downtown on my first trip was Pasquale’s Pizza at 307 Main Street #1. I stopped in for a slice of pizza and a Coke and the pizza here is really good. The slice was full of flavor with a nice gooey consistency. The service was very pleasant and on a cool Sunday afternoon was one of the few places that was open. The service is very friendly.

Pasquale’s Pizza at 307 Main Street #1

https://www.facebook.com/pasqualespizzeriaboonton/

Home

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d4310023-Reviews-Pasquale_s_Pizza-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Walking up the hill from the train tracks, you will look up at the winding main street at an interesting mix of historical buildings that are in the process of renovation or have been brought back to their original beauty.

For lunch one afternoon, I ate at Wah Yan Kitchen at 601 Main Street. This little hole in the wall take out restaurant services delicious Cantonese food at very reasonable prices for lunch. The afternoon I was there I had a Shrimp Lo Mein with a side of Pork Fried Rice and an egg roll. The one this that differed Wah Yan Kitchen from many of the take out places I have eaten at is the portion size was very large and the dish did not skip on the ingredients. There was lots of chopped roast pork in both the fried rice and in the egg roll. Everything was delicious. The family who runs the restaurant could not have been nicer to me.

Wah Yan Kitchen at 601 Main Street

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d4686643-Reviews-Wah_Yan_Kitchen-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Egg City at 605 Main Street

https://www.facebook.com/eggscityboonton/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d23640991-Reviews-Egg_City-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

On a recent trip to Boonton, I stopped at Egg City at 605 Main Street for a late breakfast. It was a beautiful sunny day and I sat by the widows watching the world go by. I ordered the Eggs with Chorizo which came with a side of potatoes and wheat toast. The scrambled eggs came in a hard scramble with plenty of spicy Chorizo sausage chopped inside the eggs. Adding some of the hot sauce provided on the table, it added an extra zing to the dish.

The Scrambled eggs with Chorizo Sausage makes a nice combination

Boonton at one time must have been a very cultural center for the arts in the region having a theater, opera house and a well established library all located within the downtown area. With the Morris Canal cutting through the town and the Ironworks at the bottom of the hill, the traffic in the downtown at the turn of the last century was extremely busy being a place of trade and shipping.

The Darress Theater at 615 Main Street has been closed during the COVID pandemic but was still open in late 2019 when it was showing some classic films. It was closed when I visited the town over the last year and a half though.

The theater was opened in 1919 as a vaudeville house with many famous names on the circuit visiting the town like Burns & Allen and Abbott & Costello. After WWII, the theater became a movie house showing first run movies until the local malls took that business away in the 1980’s. Before it closed due to COVID, it had been showing classic films and live shows (NJ Daily Record).

The Darress Theater at 615 Main Street

http://www.darresstheater.com/

https://m.facebook.com/darresstheatre/

As you make your way up the hill, you will pass the picturesque Boonton Library at 621 Main Street. The library opened in this building in 1894 in a small section of the structure. The property was bought from the Iron Company in 1849 by Eliza Scott and was used for stores. Then the building was bought by local resident James Holmes in 1856 and in 1870 and was converted into the family homes. Upon his death in 1893, he willed the building and a sum of money so that the building could be used as a town library (Best Public Libraries/History of Boonton Library).

The Boonton Public Library at 621 Main Street

https://www.boonton.org/260/Public-Library

The impressive old building holds a periodical area, a Children’s and Teen Library and a sitting area for patrons. You can still see from of the impressive details of the old building when walking around the library.

Another wonderful restaurant that I tried one afternoon after a long walking tour of Grace Lord Park was Roma Pizzeria & Restaurant at 709 Main Street. They have the most delicious cheese pizza and their garlic knots are really good. The pizza has the most amazing sauce that tastes of fresh tomatoes, garlic, a bit of hot pepper and olive oil. It really gave each bit a rich flavor. The family that runs the pizzeria is really nice too and I was able to eat at one of the outdoor tables and admire the view of the area.

Roma Pizzeria & Restaurant at 709 Main Street

https://romapizzaofboonton.com/

https://www.facebook.com/romapizzaboonton/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d5010031-Reviews-Roma_Pizzeria-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Right down the road is the old Engine/Hose Company One firehouse at 713 Main Street. This original firehouse of the Boonton Fire Department was built in the 1890’s. It was renovated in 2012 and was formerly Maxfield’s Restaurant. The building is currently empty but you can still admire the stonework of the old building and the details that showed its once fire fighting past (LoopNet.com).

The old Engine/Hose Company One at 713 Main Street

https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/713-Main-St-Boonton-NJ/14224859/

Next to the fire house is another reminder of Boonton’s cultural past is the Boonton Opera House at 715 Main Street. This architectural gem was build in 1850 as Independence Hall which was used for various functions. Then in 1890, the owner added a third floor and christened it “Mrs. Green’s Opera House”. The building was fully renovated in 2016 by business owners in the area and now houses offices and retail space (Daily Record). Check out the buildings details on the other side of the street.

The Boonton Opera House at 715 Main Street

After my walking tour of the Iron Works Company with the Historical Society and a nice lunch at Roma Pizzeria & Restaurant, I sampled Scoop House at 813 Main Street. Scoop House is an old fashioned ice cream parlor with homemade ice cream and unusual flavors. The menu includes all sorts of sundaes, shakes, ice cream sandwiches and waffle & ice cream combos.

I had an unusual flavor called “Cookie Monster”, which was a purple ice cream with cookie dough batter in it and crushed chocolate chip cookies. Talk about different and delicious! The prices are also very fair at a time when other ice cream shops are charging premium prices.

Scoop House at 813 Main Street

https://www.facebook.com/scoophouse813/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d7342984-Reviews-Scoop_House-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

I passed other businesses that were closed on most weekends and made my way to Grace Lord Park which is located at the top part of Downtown Boonton. From the sidewalks you can see the river path through the park and as you get closer to the bend, the waterfall near the bridge. This relaxing little park was once part of the Iron Works Company and where we started our walking tour of the area with the Boonton Historical Society.

Grace Lord Park in Boonton, NJ

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g46315-d10306532-Reviews-Grace_Lord_Park-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html

The front part of the park as you enter from the downtown is lined with paths, a children’s playground, a wooded area, historical signs of the site, the gazebo where concerts take place and our meeting ground for the tours and the falls.

The Falls of Grace Lord Park in Boonton, NJ

On a perfect sunny day, a group of us joined the Historical Society of Boonton, NJ on a tour of the former Iron Works Company and of a section of the Morris Canal that ran through the town during the turn of the last century.

Boonton Iron Works

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boonton_Iron_Works

Here is a link to the tour:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/3595

On my more recent trips to the park, I just enjoy walking around the Falls area and taking a short hike down the paths into the woods and admire the river. On a nice day, there are plenty of families running around the park. In the summer, there are all sorts of concerts in the park and on the weekends there is the Farmer’s Market.

https://www.boontonmainstreet.org/farmers-market

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Farmers-Market/Boonton-Farmers-Market-112114583631452/

I visited the Farmers Market on the Saturday on Labor Day weekend but the town cancelled the market at the last minute. Still there were a few vendors that had set up and I was able to sample their wares. The Schieferstein Farm from Clark, NJ had all of their fruits and vegetable lined up in bins and they had the most flavorful white peaches for a dollar. It was juicy and sweet and there is nothing like a Jersey Peach when it is in season.

Don’t miss the Schieferstein Farm stand for the sweetest Jersey Peaches

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Nurseries—Gardening-Store/Schieferstein-Farm-Market-106215647485085/

I returned the next week and there were many more vendors selling all sorts of wares at the Farmers Market. I visited Gizmo’s Pet Products for gourmet pet treats, Race Farms out of Blairstown, NJ for another sweet juicy yellow Jersey Peach ($1.00) and Urban Gypsy Arts by artist Vicki Stafford who sells handmade knit and crocheted hats and scarves, handmade earrings and pins.

A Crocheted Voodoo doll by artist Vicki Stafford, the perfect gift for Halloween

Along the way there were other vendors selling Empanadas, Italian dinners, gourmet cheese, homemade pickles and freshly baked breads and pastries. There really is something for everyone at this Farmer’s Market. There was guitar band performing that morning for the patrons with original songs and a small play area with a Cornhole set up for the kids. The Boonton Farmers Market is a nice way to spend an early Saturday morning.

On my way back down the hill through the downtown area, there are several bakery and gift shops to explore and have a quick dessert before you leave town.

Heavenly Temptations at 712 Main Street is a perfect place to duck into when it rains as it did on two afternoons when visiting Boonton. It has a extensive bakery section with cupcakes, muffins, scones, cookies and croissants. The shop also has an extensive collection of gift baskets, books, local art products and other assorted gifts. It is also a big meeting place for locals (Heavenly Temptations website).

Heavenly Temptations at 712 Main Street

https://www.facebook.com/HeavenlyTemptations/

Home

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d4604993-Reviews-Heavenly_Temptations-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

There are several places to get desserts in the downtown area. Another is Creations by Sabrina that adds a touch of elegance to their dessert selections.

Creations by Sabrina is located at 706 Main Street

https://www.creationsbysabrinallc.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Creationsbysabrinallc/

My review on TripAdvisor:

Creations by Sabrina is like walking into a bakery that treats their bakes goods like displayed jewels in a the case with beautiful and elegant looking cupcakes and cookies for sale. Each cupcake has its own unique look and flavor.

Another establishment to enjoy pastries with a Spanish flair is Pergamino’s Bakery & Café at720 Main Street. I had ducked into Pergaminos during a rainy afternoon when they were closing down for the afternoon and the people working there no only let me walk through while they were cleaning up but I could buy what I liked and they would not rush me out.

Pergamino’s Bakery & Café at 720 Main Street

https://www.facebook.com/PergaminosBC

https://pergaminos-bakery-cafe.business.site/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d23593536-Reviews-Pergaminos_Bakery_Cafe-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

What attracted me to Pergamino’s was the Columbian pastries and hot foods that the bakery restaurant carried. On my first trip, I tried a Guava Plate, which was a flaky pastry split into two and filled with cream cheese and guava jelly. It was flaky and sweet but I was not crazy about the cream cheese in the dessert.

I was also able to try their Beef and Cheese Empanadas, which I ended up taking home with me. They warmed up in the oven perfectly and I liked the spiciness of the beef which was accented by the home made hot sauce they gave me.

On the second trip, I tried one of their Apple Turnovers, which from what the staff said were really popular and I could see why. Surrounded by a sugary puff pastry, these sweet apples are rolled in cinnamon sugar and butter and baked until a golden brown.

When you reach the middle of the downtown area, you can see the remnants of the old Morris Canal that used to run through town. When I was taking my tour of the Boonton Iron Works (see above), this section of the canal was filled in years ago but at the turn of the last century, the canal was busy taking iron and other raw materials from the area to market. This is what made Boonton Boonton.

This section of the canal was called Morris Canal Inclined Plane 7 East for the machine that allowed the boats to navigate the canal to overcome changes in the elevation (Boonton Historical Marker).

Morris Canal Inclined Plane 7 East that parallels the downtown

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Canal

As I made my way down the hill, back to the car, I passed the popular Don’s Sandwich Shop and music store. I stopped in one morning after visiting the Farmer’s Market and had a Bacon, Egg and Cheese sandwich on a soft chewy roll. It was the perfect breakfast on a cool morning.

They made the sandwich with provolone cheese instead of the the traditional American cheese and with a little mayo added the perfect zing to the sandwich. The couple that runs the shop could not have been nicer to me.

There is even a music shop within the store, Drummer’s Corner, which is located in the corner of the sandwich shop.

Don’s Sandwich Shop and Drummer’s Corner

https://www.facebook.com/Dons-Sandwich-Shop-120487317968363/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g46315-d4639902-Reviews-Don_s_Sandwich_Shop-Boonton_Morris_County_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

Boonton Civil War Monument

https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=88878#:~:text=Boonton%20Civil%20War%20Monument.%20.,To%20The%20Brave%20Erected%201876%20.&text=Erected%201876.,-Topics.

Adding to the many historical sites in Downtown Boonton is the Boonton Civil War monument located in the middle of the shopping district. This interesting piece of town history was erected in 1876 and was “In grateful remembrance of their fellow citizens who volunteered in defense of The Union of the War of 1861-1865 Honor to the Brave 1876” (Monument). This touching monument is a tribute for those who were lost in the Battle of the States.

As I walked back to my car, I took time to glance at the scenic views from the main street of the foliage and mountains that make the backdrop of the downtown area. I can see why the artists are starting to move into town and the amount of art galleries that are starting to open (most were closed on the weekends on my last two visits).

Take time to walk east of the downtown to visit the historic homes of former factory workers of the Iron Works which are now being snatched up and renovated. When I drove through the downtown one last time and made my way up the hill, I drove past Grace Lord Park. Up the hill through the Essex Street neighborhood above downtown were blocks of old Victorian homes and mansions line the streets overlooking the park.

There is so much to see and visit when walking Downtown Boonton and with the influx of new residents and the energy of the present ones, it is making Boonton, NJ a vibrant and interesting town to visit.

On the Sunday of Labor Day weekend, I stayed to watch the Boonton Fire Department Labor Day Parade and that was a lot of fun. The Department marched in the parade and fire departments from all over the County joined in with their fire apparatus. It was a beautiful day for the parade.

The Boonton Fire Department had their classic apparatus in the parade

Via 57

Day One Hundred and Ninety-Nine Walking the borders of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton from West 42nd to West 59th Street from 10th to 12th Avenue to the Hudson River June 5th, 2021

Walking around Manhattan on a regular day can be challenging but when it is 93 degrees outside it can be daunting. Thank God most of Hell’s Kitchen was shaded or else I would never have made it. For such a warm day, it was not as humid as I thought it would be or else I just did not notice. I knew by the end of the day I was exhausted. I did walk over a hundred city blocks.

I started my morning at the Museum of Modern Art at 11 West 53rd Street for a private members morning reviewing the new “Cezanne Drawings ” exhibition. It was interesting to see how progressed his works from sketchbook to the final painting. What I liked about the exhibition is how the curators mounted it. Each of the set of drawings lead up to the finished work so you got to see the different perspectives that the artist was trying to achieve with each of his paintings.

Cezanne Drawing
Ceza

The Cezanne Drawing Exhibition at the MoMA at 11 West 53rd Street

What I like best about being a member of the Museum of Modern Art is that it gives you time to see all these interesting exhibitions with a limited crowd. When you are with other members, you can tell that they really want to be there and have the same open-minded approach to the works whether they like them or not.

Some of the sketches I could see where the artist, Paul Cezanne, was trying to go with the work and the changes he made along the way to the finished painting. You could see the movements and detail in each page and how he adjusted it. It was nice to be in the mind of an artist who died over a hundred years ago.

Cezanne Drawing Exhibition

One of the unfinished sketches from the pages of the Cezanne’s sketch book

Paul Cezz

Artist Paul Cezanne

https://www.paul-cezanne.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_C%C3%A9zanne

Mr. Cezanne was a French Artist who influenced in Post-Impressionism who studied at the Free Municipal School of Drawing and the University of Aix studying Law and Drawing.

After I toured the exhibition, I visited a few others that were going to close soon. I walked through the “Embodied Sensations” exhibition and admired the modern graphics along the walls and floor. Then I just wondered around the museum cooling off.

I started my walk of the border of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton at the corner of West 59th and Ninth Avenue at Amore Pizza Cafe at 370 West 58th Street. Even though I had a large breakfast, I was starved by the time I got here (see review on TripAdvisor and DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com). Because it was the weekend and most of the calzones and pizza rolls are made ahead of time, the choices were limited. I was surprised they would not make one fresh.

Amore Pizza Cafe at night at 370 West 58th Street at Ninth Avenue

I settled on a Pepperoni Roll ($5.95), which was an excellent choice. This version of a rolled personal pizza was studded with layers of spicy pepperoni and baked with a garlic butter topping and then served with a spicy tomato sauce. I have not had one of these in years and it was delicious (see my review on TripAdvisor and DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com). Each bite into those layers of pepperoni had a salty/savory flavor and was the perfect lunch for a long day of walking.

The Pepperoni rolls here are amazing!

After lunch was over, I traveled down West 59th Street to the Hudson River. It had been months since I had walked in this part of the neighborhood. I visited here in September of 2018 to finish the Borders and Streets of the lower part of the Upper West Side. In that time, several buildings had been completed and new playgrounds had opened up.

The Border of the Lower Part of the Upper West Side Day One Hundred and Twenty-One:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/7845

Since I was walking within the shade, the heat was not as bad as I thought it would be. Plus the breezes off the Hudson River were a pleasure. As I walked down West 59th Street, it was like visiting old friends.

As I walked back down to West 59th Street, I crossed the street to a popular park. Near the local school is Gertrude Ederle Playground which sits next to the Gertrude Ederle Recreation Center. This park stretches from West 59th to West 60th Street and is a very popular park with the areas families offering many whimsical playground jungle gyms and swings and a very nice field for soccer and baseball. It also offers a very nice public bathroom that is nice to have when walking around the area.

Gertrude Ederle was a champion Olympic and distance swimmer, who was a member of the 1924 Paris Olympic Games. She set over twenty world records in swimming in the early 1920’s and won a gold medal for the 400 meter freestyle relay. She swam the 22 mile harbor swim from Battery Park to Sandy Hook, NJ in a record that stood for 81 years. She also set the record for crossing the English Channel as the first American woman and received a ticker tape parade when she returned. She also appeared as herself in the 1927 romantic comedy ‘Swim, Girl Swim’. She continued to swim by teaching deaf children to swim (she had lost her hearing at this point) and lived to ripe age of 98 passing in 2003 (NYCParks.org).

Gertrude Elerde

Gertrude Ederle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_Ederle

Across the street from the park is the former IRT (Interborough Rapid Transit) Powerhouse at 840 12th Avenue. This ornate building was built in 1904 and takes up the entire area from West 59th to West 58th Street between 11th and 12th Avenues. Designed by architect Stamford White, the building is used by Con Ed of New York to supply the New York Steam system. It is designed in the ‘Renaissance Revival’ and really walk around the building you can see the beautiful details of the building especially around the building . It was recently declared a Landmark Building in New York (Wiki).

IRT Powerhouse at 840 12th Avenue

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IRT_Powerhouse

Walking across the street, I was greeted by the beauty and elegance of the new complex, One Waterline Square, which was behind fencing the last time I visited the neighborhood. The finished complex was simmering in the sunlight and in the middle of the complex is the energetic Waterline Square Park.

One Waterline Place

One Waterline Square

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterline_Square

https://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/riverside-dr-west-end-ave/one-waterline-square-10-riverside-boulevard/58492

The tiers of the park were very interesting as stairways lead to different levels of the park with fountains and trees and water features that shot up every few minutes with loads of kids and their parents screaming at each plug of water. This is when it is fun to be a kid.

The park was designed by the New York architect group, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects. This creative women-owned firm who uses a cumulative and holistic image for each project using designs that are insightful and artful as well as performative (MNLA Mission Statement)

One Waterline Square Park

One Waterline Square Park

https://www.mnlandscape.com/

https://www.mnlandscape.com/projects/waterline_square

Waterline Square Park is one of the most unusual parks that I have seen in the City since walking Battery Park City. The park has almost a Dr. Seuss effect to it with its interesting plantings, bridges and water features in all directions. It also has plenty of seating to relax and enjoy the cool breezes. All this packed in between three elegant buildings. It was fun just watching everyone have a good time.

I sat in the park for a while just trying to cool off myself as the weather got warmer that day. It was nice to sit under a tree and relax. I could believe how this whole area of the City had transformed itself from just a couple of months ago. From behind the fencing came this magical city of glass and green space.

I walked down to the extension of Riverside Park and walked the paths along the Hudson River. I had not been here since I did the Great Santier Walk. I love the cool breezes and views of the river from the park. The City did a good job on this extension of the park giving the West Side of the island the green space it needed.

Both from the street and from the paths, you get beautiful views of the cliffs on the New Jersey side of the river but still engage it via the various piers that you can walk on that jut out into the river. When you reach West 59th Street, Pier 96 and the Hudson River Pier and the boat basin giver great views of the Hudson River.

I walked around the park and saw an unusual sculpture in the shape of a bottle. The public art piece ‘Private Passage’ by artist Malcolm Cochran is a unique sculpture in that what appears to be a ship in a bottle is actually a replica of a stateroom in the Queen Mary all done in metals.  At night and in bad weather I read that the piece is illuminated.

Private Passage.jpg

‘Private Passage’ by Malcolm Cochran

Malcolm Cochran is an American artist and former Art Professor at Ohio State University. A graduate of Wesleyan College, Mr. Cochran has had many solo and group shows since the 70’s and has created numerous works all over the world. ‘Private Passage’ was created for Hudson River Park in 2005 and is an engaging piece of art where the visitors have to look inside the port holes to see the art inside the bottle. It is very clever.

Malcolm Cochran artist

Malcolm Cochran artist

Home

Turning back to Twelve Avenue, I stopped to stare at another new favorite building of mine, Via 57th on the corner of West 57th and Twelfth Avenue. This glimmering pyramid of glass stands out amongst the box structures in the neighborhood with it triangular shape and reflections of the sun and the river. It brings an elegance to the newly planted park and changes the makeup of the buildings by the river giving it futuristic look to the Hudson River.

Via 57

Via 57th along the new Hudson River Park at 625 West 57th Street (Via 57)

The Via 57
The Via

https://www.via57west.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VIA_57_West

This residential building is in the shape of a pyramid or “tetrahedron” looking ‘almost like a sailing vessel going across the river’. The tiered gardens and slopped space integrates with the surrounding park and river. The building was designed by Danish architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group and by its founding architect Bjarke Ingels (Wiki).

I walked past the back of Dewitt Clinton Park at West 54th Street to West 52nd Streets where the whole back of the park was under reconstruction.

I made my way down the greenway past all the piers where there were people sunning themselves on the grassy lawns. There was not a lot of people gathered around Pier 86 where the Intrepid Museum was located. I was not sure if it was open yet or not. Pier 83 where the Circle Line rode off from also looked quiet. In a normal year, these Piers were really busy.

The Intrepid Museum at Pier 86 is just reopening

http://www.intrepidmuseum.org/

Circle Line

The Circle Line at Pier 83 just reopened as well

https://www.circleline.com/?locale=en

Because tourism was just coming back to the City since the reopening of most activities, there were no lines or crowds of people around and the few people walking around we walking up to gates to ask what the status was of the activity. It was very different when I took the Circle Line for my birthday present to myself and saw the island of Manhattan from the water. It is just as beautiful and interesting from the water as it is from the land.

Day One Hundred and Forty Seven-Touring the Circle Line on my Birthday 2019:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/10649

I exited out of the park to West 42nd Street and Twelfth Avenue and the foot traffic was light. There were those few people milling around the neighborhood that lived there but with the lack of tourism this part of Manhattan is quiet during the day.

I had not walked down this part of West 42nd Street in a long time and had not noticed the changes that have had happened over the years. I had missed River Place at 650 West 42nd Street and Silver Towers at 620 West 42nd Street when I last walked around this part of the neighborhood. These large apartment complexes do break up the once warehouses and office buildings that dominated the area.

What stood out to me was right smack in the middle of these two complexes and that was Tom Otterness Playground at 630 West 42nd Street. This space of green reminded me of the creativity in playground design that I had seen earlier in Waterline Square Park. Combining small space with creative design to produce a whimsical park for families. It was such a nicely landscaped park and a relief from the heat. I loved the beautiful and artsy playground which is a testament to Tom Otterness’s approach to playground design.

Tom Otterness Playground jungle gym structure is whimsical

Artist Tom Otterness

http://www.tomotterness.net/

Tom Otterness is an American artist who studied at the Art Student League in New York. His work is known as ‘whimsical and fun’ but also sends a message and tells a story.

The Silver Towers is a twin residential set of towers that stand tall in the neighborhood and set the tone for the new residential section of this side of the West Side. Their brilliance in design and reception of sun light is interesting. The buildings were designed by architect Costas Kondylis and were finished in 2009.

Silver Towers at 620 West 42nd Street

https://silvertowers.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Towers

Just a little further and across the street is the sculpture of an unusual polka dot pumpkin in the front of the Sky Building at 605 West 42nd Street by artist Yayoi Kusama. The sculpture sits in front of this elegant glass residential tower in the ever changing neighborhood by the Hudson River. The Sky is a mixed use luxury residential building that was designed by architectural firm Goldstein, Hill & West and was completed in 2016 (Wiki/Moinian Group).

Sky Building

The Sky at 605 West 42nd Street

https://www.moinian.com/sky

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sky_(skyscraper)

The Sky Building

The polka dot pumpkin in front of The Sky building is by artist Yayoi Kusama is fun and interesting

Yayoi Kusama artist

Artist Yayoi Kusama

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yayoi_Kusama

http://yayoi-kusama.jp/e/information/

Artist Yayoi Kusama is a Japanese born artist who studied at the Kyoto School of Arts & Crafts and is known for her installments and sculptures but also works in film, performance art and fashion among other mediums and is known for influence in ‘Pop Art’ (Wiki/Artist Bio).

As I walked back up Tenth Avenue (the border of this side of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton), I could see that in the time since my last visit to the neighborhood that more restaurants have reopened and there was more life outside. As the weather has gotten warmer, more outdoor cafes have opened up bringing life to the quiet streets. I reached the border of the neighborhood by the late afternoon.

On the way back up, I stopped at Seguidilla Empanadas at 465 West 51st Street for a snack twice first for a Chicken Empanada ($2.99) and the second time for Country Club soda, a specialty Dominican soda ($1.95). The empanadas here are really good and served with a nice spicy sauce that brings out the flavor of the chicken. The owners kept looking up at me with stares and I kept wondering what they were thinking especially when I came back for the soda.

Seguidilla Empanadas at 465 West 51st Street is a nice cafe

Turning the corner on West 59th Street at Tenth Avenue, you will face the beauty of the John Jay College of Criminology Haaren Building at 899 Tenth Avenue. The building is home to many classrooms and the library for the college. The building was designed by Charles B.J. Snyder and was completed in 1903 (Wiki and John Jay College). The building was originally the Dewitt Clinton High School.

John Jay College

John Jay College Haaren Building at 899 Tenth Avenue

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Jay_College_of_Criminal_Justice

Since it was still early in the afternoon when I finished the borders of the neighborhood, I decided to explore the length of Eleventh Avenue from West 59th to West 42nd Street. I was floored by how many auto showrooms are located on this stretch of the avenue from all different manufacturers.

Still here and there are traces of the old neighborhood before all the rebuilding and a few new standouts that add to the Eleventh Avenue fabric. As I headed south down the avenue, I came across the Juan Alonso Community Gardens on the corner of Eleventh Avenue and West 51st Street.

Juan Alonso Community Gardens
Jun

Juan Alonso Community Gardens on the corner of West 51st Street and Eleventh Avenue

https://www.clintonhousing.org/what-we-do/cultivate-hk.php

The Community Garden was named after a local resident and community activist , Juan Alonso, who tired of seeing an empty lot and drug dealers in the area. The vacant lot is now a network of small gardens throughout the neighborhood run by the Clinton Housing Development Company (CHDC).

The garden is attached to an old tenement housing 565 West 51st Street with the interesting carving “St. Mary’s 1887” on the top. This is now affordable housing.

565 West 51st Street
565

565 West 51st Street

Another hold out of the neighborhood is the Landmark Tavern at 626 Eleventh Avenue. It was opened by Patrick Henry Carly in 1868 and has been a staple since. It is one of the oldest continuing restaurants in New York City (Landmark Tavern History). What is so fascinating about the bar is that at one time it stood on the water’s edge of the Hudson River. It shows how Manhattan has reclaimed land around the island. The restaurant has an interesting bar menu.

Landmark Tavern

The Landmark Tavern at 626 Eleventh Avenue

https://www.thelandmarktavern.com/

When walking back up Eleventh Avenue passing more auto dealerships and showrooms, I came across the Gotham West Market at 600 Eleventh Avenue, a series a small independent restaurants catering to the crowd of residents living in the building and the surrounding neighborhood. The first time I ventured in only three restaurants were open now about half are open but still you can see by the empty or closed spaces that the City still has a ways to go.

Gotham Market West

Gotham West Market at 600 Eleventh Avenue

https://www.facebook.com/GothamWestMarket/

Gotham West Market

I finished my touring of the neighborhood at Dewitt Clinton Park, which runs along Eleventh and Twelfth Avenues between West 52nd to West 54th Streets and is the biggest patch of green on this part of the neighborhood.

Dewitt Clinton Park

Dewitt Clinton Park at the Eleventh Avenue and West 52nd Street entrance

The park is a haven for joggers and sports enthusiasts and the Erie Canal Playground is really big with the kids. When I was walking around that afternoon I could not believe the language these kids were spewing at each other. These kids must have been between eight and ten years old and they sounded like truck drivers.

As I walked around the park, I saw from when I was walking around Twelfth Avenue that the back part of the park is being reconstructed and renovated with what looks like new lighting , sidewalks and stairs to be followed by new landscaping. One great attribute is that there are open clean bathrooms later in the evening.

The front part of the park is very welcoming with flower beds, nice signage, comfortable benches to relax under the trees and nice paths. When you enter the park, you are greeted by the statue of a Doughboy from WWI.

Dewitt Clinton Park statue

The Doughboy State greets you at Dewitt Clinton Park (Clinton War Memorial)

Burt W. Johnson Artist

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burt_Johnson

The statue was designed by artist Burt W. Johnson. Mr. Johnson is an American born artist who studied under noted sculptors James Earle Fraser and Augustus Saint Gaudens. The artist died shortly after the statue had been modeled (NYCParks.org). He studied at Pomona College and the Art Students League of New York (Wiki).

Dewitt Clinton
Dewitt

Dewitt Clinton, Politician and Philanthropist

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DeWitt_Clinton

The park was name after politician and philanthropist Dewitt Clinton from the prominent Dewitt and Clinton families. Mr. Clinton was the former Mayor of New York, Governor and Senator of New York State. He ran for President in 1812 losing to James Madison and was influential in the building the Erie Canal (Wiki).

I just relaxed in the park for about 45 minutes watching the parents play with their kids and people walking their dogs. It was nice to see people up and about without masks on. The park had some cool breezes from the Hudson River and it was nice to sit under a tree and review my notes. All the large shade trees made it bearable.

I walked back up Eleventh Avenue to West 59th Street early in the evening and tried to figure out where to go for dinner. I had not seen much in the neighborhood and the restaurants close by I was not in the mood for so I decided to go back to Amore Pizza Cafe. So I walked back to Ninth Avenue and ordered dinner and relaxed.

I relaxed over dinner of Linguine with Meat Sauce and a half a loaf ($9.95) and a Coke. If there was ever a dinner I enjoyed more it was that. The meat sauce was incredible and had such a rich flavor (see my review on TripAdvisor and DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com). It was so nice to just sit back and relax. I sat by the window and watched the City go by. It is amazing to watch people walk by and see the world going back to normal. The overload on carbs was helpful after a long walk.

The Meat Sauce at Amore Pizza Cafe is excellent

It is nice to walk around Manhattan and see the City I love so much returning to form to a ‘new normal’. It seems to me that “Hell’s Kitchen” is now just another name of a neighborhood and put its past behind it.

Check out the other blogs on Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/Midtown West:

Walking the Streets of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton from 10th Avenue to 12th Avenue Day Two Hundred and One:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/18362

Walking the Borders of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/ Midtown West from 10th Avenue to 12th Avenue Day Ninety-Nine:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/18087

Walking the Borders of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/Midtown West from 8th Avenue to 10th Avenue Day:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17414

Walking the Streets of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/Midtown West from 8th Avenue to 10th Avenue from West 58th to West 43rd Streets Day One Hundred and Ninety Seven:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17711

Walking the Borders of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/Midtown West Day one Hundred and Ninety Four:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17414

Places to visit:

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street

New York, NY 10019

(212) 708-9400

https://www.moma.org/

Open: Sunday-Friday 10:30am-5:30pm/Saturday 10:30am-7:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d105126-Reviews-The_Museum_of_Modern_Art_MoMA-New_York_City_New_York.html

The Juan Alonso Community Gardens

West 51st Street @Eleventh Avenue

New York, NY 10019

(212) 736-4536

https://www.instagram.com/juan.alonso.community.garden/

Open: Check their website

Gotham West Market

600 Eleventh Avenue

New York, NY 10036

(212) 582-7940

Gotham West Market

Open: Sunday-Saturday 11:00am-9:00pm/Happy Hours from 3:00pm-5:00pm

Dewitt Clinton Park

Between Twelfth and Eleventh Avenues between West 52nd and West 54th Streets

New York, NY 10019

(212) 639-9675

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/de-witt-clinton-park

Open: 6:00am-1:00am

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d10693319-Reviews-De_Witt_Clinton_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html

Places to Eat:

Seguidilla Empanadas

465 West 51st Street

New York, NY 10019

(917) 409-0183/(917) 409-0194

https://www.instagram.com/_seguidilla/?hl=en

Open: Sunday 11:00am-9:00pm/Monday-Friday 9:00am-9:00pm/Saturday 11:00am-9:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d19340572-Reviews-Seguidilla-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Amore Pizza Cafe

370 West 58th Street

New York, NY 10019

(212) 581-4200

https://amorepizzacafe.com/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 10:00am-11:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d23336838-Reviews-Amore_Pizza-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/diningonashoestringinnyc.wordpress.com/2214

Day One Hundred and Ninety-Seven Walking the Streets of Midtown West/ Clinton/Hell’s Kitchen West 42th-59th Streets from 8th-10th Avenues May 12th-19th, 2021

With classes finally behind me for the term and the Summer break here, it is time to start exploring the West side of Manhattan. I had started the borders of Midtown West/ Clinton/Hell’s Kitchen before Final exams and just finished before we ended the semester (See Day One Hundred and Ninety-Four) and it took time.

The neighborhood which is located next to the Theater District on the other said of Eighth Avenue is a mess. That part of the neighborhood is loaded with closed theaters, hotels and restaurants and loaded with graffiti. You would think the City would have had these business owners clean their buildings on a regular basis.

Day One Hundred and Ninety-Four: Walking the Borders of Midtown West/Clinton/Hell’s Kitchen:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17414

I swear sometimes I never realize the ground I have to cover for this project. I have been walking the streets of Hell’s Kitchen for three days and I am only doing half of the area. That stretch of walking back and forth through the neighborhood from Eighth to Tenth Avenues can be exhausting. This neighborhood is much different from the others I have walked in the past as most of the housing is low level former tenement buildings with a few small apartment buildings on the edges of the neighborhood. It looked like Mayor Bloomberg did not zone this area for much development.

Still block by block each is unique in its own way. Here and there tucked in a corner or on a wall is an interesting piece of street art, a pocket park, a small restaurant or an interesting quirky store and occasionally face stares at you from a building. This part of Midtown West/Clinton/Hell’s Kitchen has what we call ‘character’. Even though it still has that rough look about it, the area has pretty much been fully gentrified.

Those small tenement buildings have been sandblasting back into pristine form and many have small gardens, plantings and artwork incorporated to their entrances. A newer much younger resident has replaced the people who used to call this place “Hell’s Kitchen” and use the more historical name of “Clinton” after the family estate that used to dominate this area of the island before the Civil War. Governor George Clinton called this place home just until after the Civil War when the real changes in the neighborhood happened.

George Clinton

Governor George Clinton

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Clinton_(vice_president)

I started my walk on West 43rd Street around the corner from Eighth Avenue. This area has been going through a transition since the Bloomberg Administration rezoned the area and parts of Eighth Avenue have been rebuilt with larger hotels and office buildings. Even though COVID has emptied these areas out for the time being, the whole district around the Port Authority building has become home to more company offices and has started already to return the workers that crowded the streets here.

As I walked each street, they are pretty much lined with older tenement buildings that have been renovated and sandblasted back into more luxurious homes. I can see this in the details such as the fancier gates, the ornate door knobs, the flowering pots and small gardens that are surrounding each home. Here and there are small treasures such as interesting street art and small pocket parks and community gardens. Each block has it own attributes.

As you walk down West 43rd Street from Eighth Avenue you will pass the Martin Luther King Jr. Labor Center building for the Health Care Worker Association the 1199SEIU at 314 West 43rd Street. On the side of the building is the tile art by artist Anton Refregier that was created in 1970.

Anton Refregiermosaic

The Anton Refregier mosaic at 314 West 43rd Street. This will be demolished soon.

It captures the ideals of the labor movement with the wording saying “If there is no struggle, there is not progress”. Unfortunately this well-known mosaic can’t be moved and the building is scheduled for demolition this year. A copy is being created in the new headquarters to replace it (W42nd Street.nyc , O’Brien 2021).

Anton Refregier artist

Anton Refregier artist

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Refregier

Artist Anton Refregier was born in Moscow and moved to Paris as a teenager. He immigrated to the United States in 1920. He graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design and worked for the WPA/FPA as an artist through the Depression and was known for many of his works.

Venturing further down West 43rd Street, I stopped in front of 421 West 43rd Street and admired the embellishments and decorative carvings on the building. The front of the entrance has interesting details around the entrance. The elegant building was built in 1910 (Realty.net).

421 West 43rd Street

421 West 43rd Street stands out amongst the smaller tenement

Reaching Tenth Avenue, I travelled back down West 43rd Street and stopped in McCaffrey Playground at 341 West 43rd Street, where groups of families were chasing their small children around the park. I needed to take a break and relax so I sat towards the back of the playground. I must have stood out at 6: 4 with tinted glasses because many of the parents gave me a funny look.

McCaffrey Playground at 341 West 43rd Street

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/mccaffrey-playground

The little oasis of green was named after Monsignor Joseph A. McCaffrey, known as the ‘Bishop of Times Square’, who fought against crime in Times Square. It was at his urging of the City that the land was bought for a park to be developed for neighborhood children. It was one of the many parks built during the Robert Moses era (NYCParks.org). The playground has been renovated many times with modern play equipment and many shade trees for the weary traveller like myself.

Monsignor Joseph A. McCaffrey who the park is named after

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/90207590/joseph-a_-mccaffrey

I had read online that the Little Pie Company was on this block and I made a B-line to the bakery. The bakery is known for their small five inch individual pies and I wanted to try one.

Little Pie Company

Little Pie Company is at 424 West 43rd Street

Little Pie Company is located at 424 West 43rd Street and was founded in 1985 by actor Arnold Wilkerson who was inspired by his grandmother’s baking. I have to tell you that the Three Berry pie was delicious (see my review on TripAdvisor) and was reasonable at $9.95.

Three Berry Pie

THe Three Berry Pie at Little Pie Company is terrific

I stopped at the little park down the block and ate my little pie with gusto and ‘MMM ing’ the whole time at the tart sweet taste. Even the pigeons stared at me to get a taste.

After about fifteen minutes of relaxing and getting more stares, I moved on down West 43rd Street and turned the corner of West 44th Street. Much of the block around Eighth Avenue has been rebuilt with modern buildings but still there are many gems tucked here and there.

Being so close to the theater district, I passed two famous studios for actors. First was the New Dramatists building at 424 West 44th Street. The organization is located in the former All People’s Church which was built in the 1880’s in the Gothic Revival style for St. Matthews German Lutheran Church. The New Dramatists are an organization of playwrights founded in 1949. Playwrights serve a seven year residence here as they hone their skills (Wiki).

New Dramatist

New Dramatist building

https://newdramatists.org/

Further down the street is The Actor’s Studio at 432 West 44th Street, which is world renown as a place for actors to ‘hone their craft’. Founded in 1947 by Elia Kazan, Cheryl Crawford and Bobby Lewis and it known as the home for ‘method acting’ (The Actors Studio History Website).

The Actors Studio

The Actors Studio at 432 West 44th Street

Home

I was not sure if either organization was open at the time I was in the neighborhood because they both looked so quiet. With the theaters scheduled to open at the end of September (some say closer to December), this will become a much busier block.

Walking back down from Tenth Avenue, I passed a tiny gift shop, Domus-unaffected living at 413 West 44th Street. This quirky little store was closed on my first tour of the neighborhood and I made this my first place to visit when I came the second day (see my review on LittleShoponMainStreet@Wordpress.com and on TripAdvisor).

Domus-unaffected living

Domus-unaffected living at 413 West 44th Street

https://wordpress.com/post/littleshoponmainstreet.wordpress.com/1037

Domus-unaffected living is an interesting little gift and home furnishing store that carries many unique items from handmade throw pillows and table runners to toys, books and games for some lucky child. They carry porcelain from a local artist in the neighborhood to handmade jewelry. The store also supports small female owned manufactures and artists both here in the States and abroad and I thought that was important direction the store was taking. The owner is really nice and spent time with me explaining her business.

Domus-unaffected living

There is a little something for everyone at Domus-unaffected living

Walking down West 45th Street was interesting at the blocks between renovated tenements and small restaurants along the Avenue corridors. I was entering the core of the residential section of the neighborhood and was impressed by the pride people took in caring for their homes. Even in the pandemic, people took time to tend to their gardens and showcase their flowers which were blooming all over the neighborhood.

I stopped at Mathews-Palmer Playground at 445 West 45th Street for a quick rest. I am not sure what I am doing when I enter a park but I could see those little stares again as a single man walking into a playground to take a rest. This busy little park stretches from West 45th to West 46th and is extremely busy in the afternoons with families. Kids were running all over the place chasing one another while parents chatted.

Mathews-Palmer playground

The Mathews-Palmer Playground at 445 West 45th Street

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/matthews-palmer-playground

The park has all sorts of interesting equipment to play on and the shade trees are really nice as the weather is getting warmer. It is just fun to watch the families interacting with one another even as COVID rolls on.

The park is named after two neighborhood activists May Mathews, who worked and lived in the neighborhood eventually working at the Hartley House as the head social worker until 1954. Alexandra Palmer was a long time resident of West 46th Street who worked tirelessly to maintain the park and work with its upkeep (NYCParks.org).

Behind scaffolding in the park is a well known mural “Against Domestic Colonialism” by artist Arnold Belkin. You could not see it from the park side so I had to look up. The work was finished in 1972 during the time the artist was living in New York City between the late 60’s and early 70’s. It has been deteriorated over the last few decades (Boston.com).

Arnold Bel

The Arnold Belkin mural “Against Domestic Colonialism” before the scaffolding

http://www.mathews-palmer-playground-mural-arts-program.com/

The mural is currently undergoing a major restoration by restoration artist Denise Penizzotto.

Arnold Belkin

Artist Arnold Belkin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold_Belkin

Mr. Belkin was born in Canada and started his training at the Vancouver School of Art and continued his training later at the Banff School of Fine Arts. The artist is known for his murals large and small and his work with plastic.

Artist Denise Penizzotto

Artist Denise Penizzotto, who is handling the restoration

https://denisepenizzottostudioarts.com/home.html

Ms. Penizzotto is a professional artist with experience in project and arts management both here and abroad. She is currently attending and working at Hunter College in New York and has studied at St. Cloud University.

Another interesting mural in the park that you can see from the playground is the “Kids Project 1991” mural at the front of the park.

The “Kids Project 1991” in Mathew-Palmer Playground

(NYCParks.org/Artists Bios)

When I entered West 46th Street, most of the street was barricaded off for outdoor dining for “Restaurant Row”, a well-known group of eating establishments that cater to the theater crowd. Many of these were closed at the time I made my first visit to the neighborhood when it was colder but as the weather has gotten nicer the tables have been set up and people are enjoying outdoor dining again. The closed off block is only between Eight and Ninth Avenue.

As I passed through, I stopped to admire the plaque at the Hartley House located at 413 West 46th Street. This important establishment has been helping neighborhood residents since 1897 founded on providing education, volunteerism and charity (Hartley House History).

The Hartley House at 413 West 46th Street

http://www.hartleyhouse.org/

https://www.facebook.com/HartleyHouse/

Tucked behind an alleyway and gate is the only remainder of the old Clinton estate, the old carriage house which is now a private home. You really have to look for this hidden entrance as it is in the middle of two buildings down a narrow alley. It is like a hidden kingdom.

Clinton Court Gate

The Clinton Court gate leading back to the old carriage house

The carriage house is said to date back to the 1820’s and may be the last reminder of the old estates that used to be part of this neighborhood before the Civil War. The Clinton family had owned most of the land in this neighborhood (Untapped Cities/Emphemeralnewyork@Wordpress.com). As several bloggers mentioned, you can’t see the carriage house from the street and it is private property.

Clinton Court

The old Clinton Carriage House at 420-422 West 46th Street

I finished up the first day of walking the neighborhood exhausted. It had been a hot day and it was a lot walking from West 43rd to West 46th from Eighth to Tenth Avenues after a long day of running around. It was also still getting dark early so I finished the evening here.

I returned a few days later to finish the rest of the streets and this time left plenty of time to really look things over that I might have missed. I started my afternoon by revisiting a restaurant that had been closed for a while in Murray Hill, Hop Won at 149 East 45th Street. It was so nice that the restaurant reopened. I was scared that it had closed permanently.

The family that runs the restaurant looked like they happy to see me on that late afternoon. I had the Combination Roast Duck and Pork plate with white rice with an egg roll (see my review on TripAdvisor) and it was so good. I munched down on that for lunch and that got me through the rest of the afternoon of walking.

Don’t miss Hop Won Express at 149 East 45th Street in Midtown East

I walked from the east side to the west side after lunch and revisited some of the spots that I needed more time at like rewalking restaurant row (it was much busier on this warmer day) and Mathew-Palmer park to take a better look at the restoration after reading up on it.

I then turned the corner onto West 47th Street and came upon another painting outside the restaurant Anejo, a Mexican and Tequila Bar at 668 10th Avenue. It seems that a lot of the restaurants in the City are using artists to decorate the side walls of their restaurants.

As I walked down the street I came across the Actors Temple at 339 West 47th Street. This interesting building was built in 1917 as the West Side Hebrew Association. Because of a dwindling membership, the synagogue now rents out the space for dance, music performances and religious services (The Actors Temple NYCArts.org).

The Actors Temple Theater

The Actors Temple at 339 West 47th Street

https://www.facebook.com/actorstempletheatre/

I took a moment to relax and finish my notes at Ramon Aponte Park at 343 West 47th Street, a small pocket park in the middle of the neighborhood. This busy little park had kids running all over the place like many of the parks in the neighborhood while the parents talked amongst themselves.

Ramon Aponte Playground

Ramon Aponte Playground

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/ramon-aponte-park/highlights/14756

This wonderful little park was named after Ramon Aponte, who was the former President of the 47th/48th Street Association. When the Police Station that once stood in this spot was knocked down the spot became a vacant lot and stood empty during the high crime years of the City. He and many concerned residents of the Association thought it would make a nice green space for the neighborhood. The park opened in 1979 and it was transferred to the New York Parks system in 1987 (NYCParks.com).

I picked up the pace a bit when I got to West 48th Street. I wanted to make it to West 58th Street before dark and I was spending too much time looking at every building carefully. I was amazed for small tenement buildings that people had done such a nice job fixing them up. I wonder what the residents from thirty and forty years ago who lived in the neighborhood would think of this.

On West 48th Street, I passed the Clinton Community Garden which was closed for visitors because of COVID but I could see the volunteers working inside. The garden was not in full bloom yet from what I could see but it looked very impressive and I will have to revisit it in the future.

Clinton Community Garden

The Clinton Community Garden at 434 West 48th Street

When the Clinton Community Garden was started over thirty years ago, it was vacant lot with a lot of illegal activity in a time when the City was falling apart. Volunteers cleaned the plot up and planted the area. When the lot was threatened to be sold, the volunteers from the neighborhood appealed to the City to buy it. It was transferred to the Parks system in 1984 and now is run along with the Clinton Garden non profit. Many special events happen in the Garden during the warmer months (NYCParks.org).

When I reached Tenth Avenue again, I relaxed in Hell’s Kitchen Park which lines Tenth Avenue between West 47th and 48th Streets. This restful park was always busy when I walked in the neighborhood and was a nice place to bring my lunch on several afternoons when I want to rest from a long day under the shade.

Hell’s Kitchen Park is on Tenth Avenue between West 47th and 48th Street

Hell’s Kitchen Park has an interesting history in that it had once been a parking lot. Since there was not a lot of green space in this area of the City since it was developed, the City bought this land which had been condemned at the time and developed into the current park that opened in 1979. Today it is one of the hubs for the neighborhood (NYCParks.org).

When I visited, there was always a pickup game of basketball and the kids populated the park after school. I enjoyed eating my lunch here and watching the families enter the park and have a nice time. It is nice to relax on the benches below the shade trees and nod off.

After my break at the park, I turned the corner again and walked down West 49th Street from Tenth Avenue. As I passed the Mather Building Arts and Craftsmanship HIgh School at 439 West 49th Street. On the side of the building, there was another interesting piece of outdoor art by artist Hans Hofmann called ‘Untitled’. The mosaic was created in 1957.

“Walls of Color” on the Mural of Hans Hofmann

Hans Hofmann artist

Artist Hans Hofmann

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Hofmann

Artist Hans Hofmann was born in Germany and started his career in public service but always leaned towards the creative arts. On encouragement, his studied at the Academie de la Grande Chaumiere and the Academie Colarossi in Paris and immersed himself in the Avante-Garde scene. He moved to the States in the thirties to teach and remained in the United States for the rest of his life becoming a citizen in 1941 (Wiki).

Next to the high school was the closed and probably much needed Gutenberg Playground at 420 West 49th Street named after Johann Gutenberg, the inventor of moveable type in printing and was noted for creating the ‘Mazarin Bible’ also known as the ‘Gutenberg Bible’. The playground was built next to the high school in 1958 and was transferred to the NYC Parks Department in 1959. The playground is currently getting an update (NYCParks.org).

Gutenberg Playground

The Gutenberg Playground at 420 West 49th Street

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/gutenberg-playground

Jo

Printer & Artist Johannes Gutenberg

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Johannes-Gutenberg

Walking back to Eighth Avenue, I had to make another rest stop in the courtyard of the World Wide Plaza Residence at 350 West 50th Street which stretches from West 49th to 50th Streets. It is a nice place to take a break and just relax from the traffic of the City.

In the middle of the courtyard of the building that is open to the public, is the most unusual and beautiful fountain. The fountain called “The Four Seasons” was designed by artist Sidney Simon and each of the four female statutes holds up a globe and represents the four seasons. The statutes were modeled by Molly Ackerman (Wiki).

World Wide Plaza Fountain

The World Wide Plaza Fountain “The Four Seasons” by artist Sidney Simon

Sidney Simon artist

Artist Sidney Simon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidney_Simon

Sidney Simon was an American born artist from Pennsylvania. He was educated at Carnegie-Mellon and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a BA in Fine Arts and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Known as a sculpturist, the fountain at World Wide Plaza was considered one of his most noted works (Wiki).

When I turned the corner onto West 50th Street and walked down the street, I passed the Stella Tower at 425 West 50th Street which was an elegant building in the middle of a neighborhood of small structures. The apartment house was built in 1927 and designed by architect Ralph Walker and was named after his wife, Stella. It is considered a prime example of Pre-War architecture with art deco details (StreetEasy.com/CityRealty.com)

425 West 50th Street-The Stella Tower

https://streeteasy.com/building/stella-tower

I walked down the rest of the street admiring the small buildings and the array of restaurants that lined the Avenues.

When I started my walk down West 51st Street, I came across the most intriguing and colorful paintings outside ‘ritas Restaurant at 756 Ninth Avenue. The colors are so vibrant and the skull in the middle of the mural is pretty powerful. The reviews on online say that the food is excellent.

'ritas restaurant

The Mural at ‘ritas Restaurant at 756 Ninth Avenue should not be missed

https://www.ritashk.com/

As I walked towards Tenth Avenue, I noticed the beautiful Sacred Heart of Jesus Church at 457 West 51st Street. What an interesting little church. Even though the cornerstone was laid in 1884, there is some debate on when the church was finished and designed by who. The church says it was finished in 1885 and the AIA Guide to New York said it was finished in 1901 and designed by the architects at Napoleon DeBrun & Sons. The church is designed in red brick and terra cotta (Wiki).

Sacred Heart of Jesus Church at 457 West 51st Street

https://shjnycparish.org/

Walking back down the street, I noticed to beautifully detailed buildings that stood out amongst all the others. One was at 330 West 51st and the other was at 306 West 51st Street. They stood out amongst the smaller tenements buildings on the block.

The stone work and carvings of 330-332 West 51st Street was built in 1920 and has interesting archway entrances. The building is an SRO and was just renovated. There is an elegant beauty to it with its faded stone work.

330-332 West 51st Street

330-332 West 51st Street-The Stardom Building

https://streeteasy.com/building/330-west-51-street-new_york

The stone work of 306-310 West 51st Street also shows an elegant beauty in its stonework and impressive entrance. This apartment building was built in 1945 (StreetEasy.com).

306-310 West 51st Street

306-310 West 51st Street

https://streeteasy.com/building/306-west-51-street-new_york

There were also two interesting restaurants that I popped my head into when I was walking around. The Hudson Market Place Deli at 755 Ninth Avenue and another small restaurant that just opened Seguidilla Empanadas at 455 West 51st Street. Both look really nice and are pretty popular in the neighborhood.

Seguidilla Empanada just opened their doors and did this video on YouTube:

The owner welcomes you to his business.

When I walked the neighborhood another afternoon and was traveling the border of the neighborhood I stopped in for a snack. I tried the Chicken Empanada ($2.99) and they were really good. The empanadas were filled with chicken and served it with a pink sauce. They also carry a Dominican soda called ‘Country Club’ and the orange really hit the spot. They have a nice menu.

Turning the corner onto West 52nd, there was a lot to see. At 348 West 52nd Street is an empty carriage house that was in the process of being renovated. The carriage house was built somewhere in the 1870’s by owner, John Newcomb, who ran an auction business. He used this carriage house for his stables for delivery. Since his ownership, the building has had many incarnations up until recently when it was a trendy bar called ‘Therapy’ (Daytonian 2019).

348 West 52nd Street

348 West 52nd Street-The John Newcomb Stable now “Therapy”

Outside Crispin’s Restaurant at 764 Tenth Avenue off West 52nd Street is an unusual mural outside the restaurant that I thought was very amusing. This wonderful Italian restaurant I have read has excellent food.

Crispens Restaurant

Crispin’s Restaurant mural on West 52nd Street and Tenth Avenue

https://www.instagram.com/crispinsrestaurant/?hl=en

By this point, I needed a break for dinner myself and I was dying for a hamburger. Lucky for me that I found Lucky’s Famous Burger restaurant at 370 West 52nd Street. This little hole in the wall burger place is excellent. They are also very reasonable. For $12.95, I had one of their combination meals of a Cheeseburger with fries and a large coke. The amount of food I got was a lot.

Lucky's

Lucky’s Famous Burgers at 370 West 52nd Street

The cheeseburger was incredibly juicy and the fresh toppings really made the burger and the fries were cooked to perfection and the portion size was more than generous (please read my review on Tripadvisor).

After dinner was over, I was done for the day. It was getting dark out and I could not see much in the dark. I just could not believe how fast these days went.

When I returned a few days later, the weather finally broke and it was nice outside. It was a breathtaking beautiful sunny afternoon when I arrived in Midtown West/ Hell’s Kitchen again. It was the perfect day to walk around.

I started by walk on the top of West 52rd Street, passing the many businesses I had just visited the other day and then rounded the corner to West 53th Street. Most of the block was non-descrip with the exception of an unusual mural someone spray painted behind a fence at 333 West 53rd Street.

As I rounded the corner onto West 54th Street off Eighth Avenue, I was struck by the beauty of the Saint George Greek Orthodox Church at 307 West 54th Street. This beautiful church was constructed in 1886 and has served many purposes over the years. In the 1950’s, the church took over this spot (Saint George Greek Orthodox Church history)

Sait

307 West 54th Street-Saint George Greek Orthodox Church

http://www.saintgeorgenyc.org/

Further down the block, when I passed 341 West 54th Street, I saw a series of faces staring back at me. I love these buildings with faces all over them. I was in need of something sweet to keep me going with all the walking that I had to do this afternoon, so I stopped at Huascar & Company Bakery at 453 West 54th Street. This tiny bakery is tucked into a corner near a building that is being renovated so it is easy to miss.

Huascar & Company

Huascar & Company at 453 West 54th Street

Not wanting to have the usual cupcakes and cookies, I saw in a jar a small cookie that the woman behind the counter said was a traditional South American cookie, a Alfagar, a type of sugar cookie with a caramel filling and powdered sugar on top. It was a little expensive at $3.50 but it was delicious and worth the price.

The

The ‘Alfagar cookie’ at Huascar & Company bakery

After having some refreshments inside me, I walked down West 55th Street and noticed the elegance of the Sherwood Apartments at 340 West 55th Street. The Sherwood was built in 1925 and is a combination of stone and brick and has some stand out balconies. It stands out from the other residences on the blocks between Eighth and Tenth Avenues (StreetEasy.com). It even has a planted roof deck.

340 West 55th Street-The Sherwood Apartments

https://streeteasy.com/building/340-west-55-street-new_york

When walking down West 56th Street, I noticed that the block had some interesting artwork all along the block in places you would never think. In front of 424 West 56th Street, you are greeted by a purple figure smiling at you. I figured a local artist lives here.

They must have also decorated the fence across the street which has all this unusual stuff attached to the webbing of the fence. It will be hard to keep up when the construction finishes on the site.

310

This is a portion of the fencing at 310 West 56th Street

Tucked into the public plaza at 330 West 56th Street, there was an unusual bird sculpture located near the entrance but I did not know who made it. It had the strangest shape to it.

Walking through the courtyard of The Sheffield at 322 West 57th Street from the West 56th Street side, I came across the unusual sculpture ‘IKON’ by artist David Hostetler. This strange portrait of a woman made an impression on everyone relaxing in the garden. The sculpture has an unique form and stands out in the courtyard.

"IKON" by David Hostetler

The sculpture “IKON” by artist David Hostetler at between West 56th and 57th courtyard of The Sheffield complex

Artist David Hostetler

Artist David Hostetler

Artist David Hostetler is an American born artist from Ohio. He graduated with a BA from Indiana University and a MFA from Ohio University. He specialty was wooden and bronze sculpture and known for his ‘feminine’ works (Artist Bio).

When I rounded West 57th Street from Eighth Avenue passing the The Sheffield again I passed another building at 309 West 57th Street. On the outside of the building was a plaque to the composer Bela Bartok.

Bela Bartok

The plaque dedicated to Hungarian composer Bela Bartok, one most influential composers of the 20th Century. Mr. Bartok was born in Hungary and studied at Royal Academy of Music in Budapest and studied under many well known composers. He migrated to the United States in 1940 with his wife when he refused to recognize the Nazi regime. He remained in New York for the rest of his life working for Columbia University

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_Bart%C3%B3k

YouTube video on his life on the block:

When I walked along West 58th Street again, I noticed that a lot of the restaurants and stores had closed during the era of COVID. This part of the City has really taken a hit with the lack of tourists and office workers. There is only so much the local residents can support. I walked towards the back of the Time Warner Building and walked past the back entrance to the Time Warner Building and I noticed a piece of street art that I had not noticed on my last few trips in the neighborhood. That statue is called “Asaf and Yo’oh” by artist Boaz Vaadia and is tucked into the entrance of the building at 25 Columbus Circle-1 Central Park West.

Asaf and Yo'oh statue

Asaf and Yo’oh statue by artist Boaz Vaadia

Boaz V

Boaz Vaadia Artist

http://www.vaadia.com/

The artist was born in Israel and came from a farming background. He studied at the Avni Institute of Fine Arts in Tel Aviv and was sent to the United States on a grant from the American-Israel Cultural Foundation and then studied at Pratt. His works are made of varies mediums of stone (Artist Bio).

It was surprising how quiet the hotel looked as the Mandarin Hotel was one of the few uptown hotels that are still open during the pandemic. No one was around so it gave me a chance to peak inside the building which looked empty. With most people still working from home I did not expect to see a lot but the area is getting busier.

I ended my walk on the last afternoon at 57 Taco Express for lunch. I was in the mood for a Cheese and Chicken Quesadilla ($5.99) and ordered one and took it down to Hell’s Kitchen Park for lunch. It was nice to just sit back and relax and watch the world go by. The quesadilla was pretty good. It was nice to eat it in a sunny park under the trees watching everyone have a great time around me. Some people have not let the pandemic totally control their life.

Midtown West/Hell’s Kitchen offers so much so take time to stroll each street and take it all in.

With the College in Summer recess, its full steam ahead!

Check out the other walks of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/Midtown West on the blog:

Walking the Border and Avenues of Hell’s Kitchen Day One Hundred and Ninety Four:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17414

Walking the Streets of Hell’s Kitchen Day One Hundred and Ninety Seven:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17711

Walking the Borders of Hell’s Kitchen (Western Side) Day One Hundred and Ninety Nine:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/18087

I had to split the neighborhood into two parts separated by 10th Avenue as there was so much to see and the complexity of the neighborhood changes on each side.

Places to Visit:

McCaffrey Playground

West 43rd Street

New York, NY 10036

(212) 639-9675

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/mccaffrey-playground

Open: Sunday-Saturday 7:00am-6:00pm

Mathews-Palmer Playground

445 West 45th Street

New York, NY 10036

(212) 639-9675

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/matthews-palmer-playground

Open: Sunday-Saturday 7:00am-6:00pm

Ramon Aponte Playground

343 West 47th Street

New York, NY 10036

(212) 639-9675

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/ramon-aponte-park/highlights/14756

Open: Sunday-Saturday 7:00am-6:00pm

The Clinton Community Garden

434 West 48th Street

New York, NY 10036

https://www.nycgovparks.org/about/history/community-gardens/greatness

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Community-Service/Clinton-Community-Garden-318178681536860/

Open: Please visit the website

Hell’s Kitchen Park

10th Avenue between West 47th and 48th Streets

New York, NY 10036

(212) 639-9675

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/hells-kitchen-park

Open: Sunday- Saturday 9:00am-6:00pm

Gutenberg Playground

420 West 49th Street

New York, NY 10036

(212) 639-9675

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/gutenberg-playground

Open: Sunday-Saturday 6:00am-7:00pm

Places to Shop:

Domus-unaffected living

413 West 44th Street

New York, NY 10036

https://www.facebook.com/domusnyc/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 12:00pm-6:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g60763-d23393394-r789072137-Domus_unaffected_Living-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on LittleShoponMainStreet@Wordpress.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/littleshoponmainstreet.wordpress.com/1037

Places to Eat:

Little Pie Company

424 West 43rd Street

New York, NY 10036

(877) 872-7437

https://www.facebook.com/LittlePieCompany/

Open: Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm/Monday-Friday 9:00am-6:00pm/Saturday 10:00am-6:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d1008105-Reviews-Little_Pie_Company-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Hop Won Chinese Noodle Shop

139 East 45th Street

New York, NY   10017

https://hopwonrestaurant.netwaiter.com/

Telephone: (212) 661-4280/867-4996

Fax: (212) 867-0208

Open: Sunday Closed/Monday-Friday 10:00am-8:45pm/Saturday 11:00am-7:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d4760804-Reviews-Hop_Won_Restaurant-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

*Just reopened in March 2021 for indoor dining

Lucky’s Famous Burgers

370 West 52nd Street

New York, NY 10019

https://www.luckysfamousburgers.com/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 11:00am-11:00pm

(212) 247-6717

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d946855-Reviews-Lucky_s_Famous_Burgers-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Huascar & Company

453 West 54th Street

New York, NY 10019

(212) 933-1041

https://www.facebook.com/hbakeshop/

Open: Sunday 11:00am-8:00pm/Monday-Saturday 10:00am-8:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d12120864-Reviews-Huascar_Co_Bakeshop-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

57 Taco Express

858 Tenth Avenue

New York, NY 10019

(212) 489-5007/(212) 586-0685

https://www.seamless.com/menu/57-taco-express-fresco-tortillas-858-10th-ave-new-york/2027174

Open: Sunday 11:00am-10:30pm/Monday-Friday 10:30am-10:30pm/Saturday 11:00am-10:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g60763-d23406045-r789262819-57_Taco_Express-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Seguidilla Empanadas

465 West 51st Street

New York, NY 10019

(917) 409-01863/(917) 409-0194

https://www.instagram.com/_seguidilla/?hl=en

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d19340572-Reviews-Seguidilla-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Hell's Kitchen Playground

Day One Hundred and Ninety-Four Walking the Borders and Avenues of Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/Midtown West Eighth to Tenth Avenues West 59th to West 42nd Streets April 5th, 2021

I finally got back to the West Side of the Island since before the Christmas holidays of 2019. I could not believe it had that long since I had visited that part Island. Like the rest of Manhattan, this area just keeps changing. COVID has changed the rest of the country but in New York City, it has shuttered and changed whole neighborhoods.

Unlike the Midtown South neighborhood that had been built as Midtown business district during the “City Beautiful Era” of cities between the Civil War and WWI with its classic Beaux Arts and French Renaissance style buildings, Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton was filled with tenements and smaller commercial buildings that catered to the working class living there who were employed in the factories and the docks in Chelsea and the Garment District. Up until the early 1990’s, this was still a pretty tough area. As the City has gentrified, this is one of the last frontiers for people to move into reasonably. Up until COVID hit the City, the area had been fully gentrified and the corridors of Ninth and Tenth Avenues had become ‘restaurant rows’ for the theater district . Now Tenth Avenue is retrenching with a lot of empty storefronts.

I started my walk at the Port Authority which is the southern part of the neighborhood. This is the main port of transportation for thousands of workers from New Jersey and in pre-COVID times, this area was filled with active restaurants and theaters. Things have opened back up slowly but most of the restaurants for now closed. The 42nd Street Corridor from Eight to Sixth Avenue has not fully recovered from the lost of the Theater traffic. As I walked up Eight Avenue from West 42nd to 59th Streets, some restaurants were fully opened and some were take out and delivery so the foot traffic was pretty quiet that day. Even some of the hotels have not opened back up for business. This area has been hit very badly since the closure of the Theater District.

Since Midtown West had been rezoned eight years ago, the area is in the process of being knocked down and rebuilt with new office buildings and apartment houses. The area around Eight Avenue from West 42nd to 50th Streets has changed a lot in the last ten years. COVID has closed most of the restaurants on the street as well. Looking on the side streets many of the theaters in the Theater District are either chained closed or boarded up with the hotels in the neighborhood. It can be a scary ghost town at night.

The area has had an interesting past. During Colonization by the Dutch, the neighborhood was known as “Great Kill” due to three streams that used to empty into the Hudson River and was home to many large farms and estates of the wealthy . The area was dominated by family names such as Hopper and Clinton, the latter being the former Vice-President and New York State Governor George Clinton, whose family owned a villa around where present West 46th Street is now. All that is left of that part of the neighborhood’s history is the carriage house from the estate in an alleyway at 422 West 46th Street (Wiki).

George Clinton

Former Vice-President and New York Governor George Clinton

https://www.britannica.com/biography/George-Clinton-vice-president-of-United-States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Clinton_(vice_president)#:~:text=A%20prominent%20Democratic%2DRepublican%2C%20Clinton,hold%20office%20under%20two%20presidents.

In 1849, the railroad reached the neighborhood and it started to form its Industrial stage with tanneries and docks being built along the shore and shanty towns for workers forming along the waterfront. Later tenements were built to house the workers of the industries filling with recent Irish immigrants after the Civil War and the area had a notorious reputation for gang violence until gentrification started in the 1980’s. The neighborhood has been transforming since that time with new construction along the West 42nd to 59th corridor along Eighth Avenue (Wiki).

The area is still in a state of transformation even during the Global Pandemic. Many of the restaurants around the neighborhood have closed partially due to the closing of Broadway theaters that dominate the neighborhood and the empty office buildings that line Eighth Avenue. The ‘Theater District’ that lies just east of the neighborhood is still mostly boarded up as well as the hotels are still all closed. It makes it spooky at night to walk through almost similar to those years in the 1980’s and early 1990’s when you had to run down Eighth Avenue to get to the Port Authority.

The edges of this neighborhood have changed a lot in the past twenty years. Between the redevelopment of the area under the Koch and Giuliani Administrations and the rezoning under the Bloomberg Administration, the Eighth Avenue corridor and streets from West 40th to 45th have all been rebuilt. I have never seen so much change in an area in the last twenty years.

Pre-COVID the Port Authority between West 42nd to West 41st Streets from Eighth to Ninth Avenues was going through a face-life renovation and the facility started to move out all the older stores and restaurants for higher end takeout places and an art gallery. It looks now that it has been put on hold until people start to return.

Port Authority

The Port Authority Bus Terminal at 625 Eighth Avenue

https://www.panynj.gov/bus-terminals/en/index.html

Since I returned to Manhattan to resume this project last June, the traffic going through the Port Authority has not changed much even though there are more people on the bus. The afternoon I came into the City it was sunny and 66 degrees. More outdoor dining was in play and more people were outside enjoying the weather.

I started my walk exiting the Port Authority at the corner of Eighth Avenue and West 42nd Street, a corner that still needs a lot of work. Pre-COVID this was a bustling area of theaters, shops and restaurants and one of the biggest McDonald’s in the country. Most of it is closed down now and the homeless have taken back over this area. Surprisingly though, it still remains clean a result of the Partnerships established in the mid-1990’s. This area is swept all day long.

As I walked along the eastern border of Midtown West/Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton, there is a distinct change in the area. Even if many of the hotels and theaters are closed, slowly the restaurants in the Theater District have reopened to outdoor dining giving this area a much needed boost.

One of the most interesting buildings in the Times Square area is the Westin New York at Times Square at 270 West 43rd Street which stretches from West 42nd to West 43rd along Eighth Avenue. This hotel (which is currently closed during COVID) was considered one of the most innovative designed buildings in New York City when it was built.

Westin New York at Times Square

Westin New York at Times Square at 270 West 43rd Street

https://www.marriott.com/hotels/hotel-photos/nycsw-the-westin-new-york-at-times-square/

The hotel was so innovative at the time when it was built and was considered a key in the redevelopment of the West 42nd Street district. The hotel was commissioned by the architectural firm of Arquitectonica to design the building. The 863 room hotel is actually two towers merged together with a ten story midsection for retail and hotel suites. The large scale abstract design has the look of a multi-dimensional gigantic origami (Arquitectonica website). The building was designed by HKS architects and was finished in 2002.

Further up Eight Avenue is the well-known Row NYC Hotel at 700 Eighth Avenue. This hotel opened in 1928 as the Hotel Lincoln and was the largest hotel in Manhattan when it opened with 1331 rooms. In 1957, the hotel was sold and remodeled and open again as The Hotel Manhattan. It was closed in the 1960’s as the rest of the area declined. It reopened again as the Milford Plaza Hotel in 1978 and was a big theater going hotel. In 2013, the hotel was sold once again and went through another renovation and opened as the currently Row NYC Hotel (Wiki).

The Row NYC Hotel

The Row NYC Hotel at 700 Eighth Avenue

https://www.rownyc.com/times-square-hotel/

The famous “Milford Plaza” commercial from 1985

Passing now closed hotels and restaurants that line this part of Eighth Avenue that border the theater district, I passed the now closed Smith’s Bar, which has been a fixture in Times Square for over sixty years opening in 1954. The bar had been sold to new owners in 2009 and then closed in 2014 to reopen a year later. The bar is now closed again due to the COVID pandemic.

Smith’s Bar at 701 Eight Avenue

https://www.facebook.com/Smithsbarhellskitchen/

This bar has seen Times Square go through a major transition over the years and was once located in one of the worst areas during the 1990’s. It survived all of that and closed a few months ago due to the COVID pandemic.

Further up the avenue on the corner of Eighth Avenue and West 46th Street is the West 46th Street SRO. This interesting building that I thought was an elegant Victorian is actually a combination of three former tenement buildings and two residences to make one building. Architects Oaklander, Coogan & Vitto PC created this interesting building with an additional shared floor topped with a mansard roof and tower. It used to house many trendy restaurants and bars but since the pandemic has been empty (OCV Architects PC).

West 46th Street SRO

West 46th Street SRO is an interesting building

https://ocvarch.com/

I reached West 48th Street and I passed Engine 54/Ladder 4/Battalion 9, which I used to pass all the time when I worked down the road at the Java Shop on the corner of Broadway and West 46th Street at 782 Eighth Avenue. These companies were hit hard a year after I left my job on 9/11 when the Brothers of this house lost 15 members that day, their entire shift. The memorial they have to their members is really touching and the guys that work there always seem so friendly to all the tourists that pass by.

Engine 54/Ladder 4/Balallion 9

Engine 54/Ladder 4/Battalion 9 at 782 Eighth Avenue

Engine 54 Memorial

Pay respects to the Engine 54/Ladder 4 Memorial on the front of the building

I made a detour back to West 55th Street for lunch. I stopped at Stage Star Deli at 105 West 55th Street for a sandwich before I continued the walk around the neighborhood. The deli is so reasonable and has so many choices (See my reviews on TripAdvisor and DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com).

Stage Star Deli at 105 West 55th Street

I chose a Chicken Salad sandwich with Pesto combination lunch ($8.95) which was excellent. The chicken salad was so fresh and the pesto had such a nice flavor. The sandwich was served on a hero roll and could have fed two people. The food here is consistent and excellent.

The Chicken Salad with Pesto here is excellent

After lunch I headed down the road to Myzel Chocolate at 140 West 55th for dessert. I had not been there in over a year since the shutdown of the City last March. I had to have one of their Chocolate Chip cookies and they still had Cadbury Creme Eggs from Easter (See reviews on TripAdvisor and LittleShoponMainStreet@Wordpress.com). I was shocked when the bill came to $4.10. For a cookie and a piece of candy that must have been a month old?

Myzel's Chocolate

Myzel’s Chocolate at 140 West 55th Street

I talked with the owner, Mrs. Myzel and she was talking about the lack of business since the shut down and all the problems the City was facing with the homeless and the lack of office workers. I told her it would be about a year until things started to get to the new normal. Still the store had so much of its magic to it with all the decorations and displays. It is a store to visit to forget your troubles.

Mrs. Myzel

Mrs. Myzel greets all her customers with a smile

There are two wonderful Chinese restaurants that I like to visit when I am in the neighborhood. One is Peking Roast Duck at 858 Eighth Avenue, which has wonderful lunch specials until 4:00pm. The restaurant has some of the best egg rolls that I have tasted in a long time.

Chef Pho & Peking Roast Duck 858 8th Ave New York, NY - MapQuest

Peking Roast Duck Restaurant at 858 Eighth Avenue

The other is Real Kung Fu Little Steamed Buns at 811 Eighth Avenue which is known for their Pork & Crab and Pork Soup Dumplings. I love their fried dumplings, Scallion pancakes with sliced beef, the pan-fried Duck Buns and the Shanghai pan-fried pork buns. Everything on the menu here is excellent and you can eat your way through the menu of delicious Dim Sum.

EATAKU — Kung Fu Little Steamed Buns Ramen, NYC

Real Kung Fu Little Steamed Buns at 811 Eighth Avenue

I double backed to Eighth Avenue after lunch and walked up the avenue to West 59th Street. As I continued up Eighth Avenue and circled Columbus Circle, I saw the familiar sites of the statue of Christopher Columbus and the Time-Warner Complex in the background. It has been almost two years since I finished the Upper West Side of Manhattan and even as I walk those streets again I always feel like I missed something. In the era of COVID, it keeps changing so much.

christopher-columbus-statue-ii.jpg

Columbus Circle has changed over the last twenty years

Columbus Circle was always busy day and night with street vendors, bicyclists, performers and just people sitting and reading or enjoying the weather and people watching on a warm day. Now because of the ‘Cancel Culture’ crowd dominating the headlines and the idiots knocking down statues, the area is fenced off with police cars around it. It used to be such a nice area to sit down and talk.

The 76 foot statue was designed by Italian sculptor Gaetano Russo as part of a plan to honor Columbus’s discovery of the Americas as part of the 1892 commemoration of the 400 year anniversary of the event. If you look closely at the pillar, you will see the reliefs of the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria ships on the memorial (Columbus Memorial and Wiki).

Gaetano Russo

Gaetano Russo

https://www.askart.com/artist/artist/11066965/artist.aspx

Columbus Circle itself was part of the great plan of Central Park in 1857 by Fredrick Law Olmsted, the designer of many parks in New York City as having four rotary entrances to the park. The other rotary in the neighborhood is Grand Army Plaza by The Plaza Hotel.

The Time Warner Center on the other side of the circle represents the massive change in the Upper West Side from a liberal working class area to the new luxury of Manhattan.  The Time Warner Center is a mixed use building containing office space,  the Mandarin Hotel, many exclusive restaurants and shops and entertainment. The building was designed by David Childs and Mustafa Kemel Abadan of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. This modern palace of luxury replaced the old New York Coliseum and opened in 2003 (Wiki). Don’t miss just wondering around the building.

Time Warner Building

Time Warner Building at 10 Columbus Circle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Warner_Center

On the other side of the Circle is the new Museum of Art & Design that opened in 2008. The building was the former home of the Gallery of Modern Art designed by Edward Durell Stone in 1969. The building was modernized by architect Brad Cloepfil (Wiki) and the museum shows interesting aspects of art from media, video, painting and photography.

Museum of Arts & Design.jpg

Museum of Art and Design at 2 Columbus Circle

As I crossed the street, the neighborhood is full of Post War architecture but one building stands out with its modern twist. The Hearst Tower at 300 West 57th Street.

hearst-tower.jpg

The Hearst Tower at 300 West 57th Street

https://www.hearst.com/real-estate/hearst-tower

The first six floors of the original Hearst Tower were built in 1928 by architect Joseph Urban for the headquarters of the Hearst publishing empire. The building was originally supposed to have an office tower on top but the Great Depression put a stop to the construction. Take a look at the statuary, stone work and details of the original building before admiring the new addition (Wiki).

hearst-tower-ii.jpg

Admire the detail work of the original 1928 building

Architect Norman Foster designed the 46 story addition to the building which was completed in 2006. The addition of glass and steel is designed in the ‘Diagrid’ pattern and was the first ‘green building’ with environmental features in New York City (Wiki).

I then walked across that street to the Time Warner Building right off the subway station under Columbus Circle (it is amazing where they put this stuff) to the food court in the subway station. The Turnstyle Underground Market is located at the West 59th Street entrance at the Time-Warner Building. Just take the escalator down.

Turnstyle Underground

The Turnstyle Underground is in the subway station at the Time Warner Building at 59 Columbus Circle

https://www.turn-style.com/

https://www.facebook.com/turnstylenyc/

The food court market had just reopened a few months ago and the place was more than half empty. All the great little restaurants that were independently owned were gone. VIctims to the COVID pandemic and the lack of tourists and office workers. I had read that my favorite, Daa Dumplings had closed about four or five months ago due to lack of traffic (See Day One Hundred and Fifty-Walking the Borders of Central Park South):

Day One Hundred and Fifty-MywalkinManhattan:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/10729

If I saw four people sitting down there, it was a lot. Most of the restaurants were empty and almost all the small stores were gone as well. Even the bar that was so popular at the end of the food court and the small independent pizzeria were shut down. It was really spooky because just a year and a half earlier your could not get a seat here.

I walked towards the back of the Time Warner Building and walked past the back entrance to the Time Warner Building and I noticed a piece of street art that I had not noticed on my last few trips in the neighborhood. That statue is called “Asaf and Yo’oh” by artist Boaz Vaadia and is tucked into the entrance of the building at 25 Columbus Circle-1 Central Park West.

Asaf and Yo'oh statue

Asaf and Yo’oh statue by artist Boaz Vaadia

Boaz V

Boaz Vaadia Artist

http://www.vaadia.com/

The artist was born in Israel and came from a farming background. He studied at the Avni Institute of Fine Arts in Tel Aviv and was sent to the United States on a grant from the American-Israel Cultural Foundation and then studied at Pratt. His works are made of varies mediums of stone (Artist Bio).

It was surprising how quiet the hotel looked as the Mandarin Hotel was one of the few uptown hotels that are still open during the pandemic. No one was around so it gave me a chance to peak inside the building which looked empty. With most people still working from home I did not expect to see a lot.

West 59th and 58th Streets are disrupted in their flow by the Time Warner Building and I continued my walk across West 58th Street and then crossed back over to West 59th behind the complex. This area of the City was part of major urban renewal project back in the 1960’s when the Lincoln Center complex and the Colleges were built so most of the construction up here is new or been updated. I have seen a lot of changes since I walked this neighborhood in when walking the area in 2018 (See Day One Hundred and Twenty-Five-MywalkinManhattan).

Day One Hundred and Twenty-Five: Walking the Streets of the lower part of the Upper West Side:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/7899

Still here and there are gems of architecture from another era. Walking down West 59th Street there are still structures that survived urban renewal of the area. I passed the the Parish House of the Church of St. Paul at 415 West 59th Street. The building was built in the late Victorian Gothic Revival style by architects Jeremy O’Rourke and the Rev. George Deshon between 1876 to 1884. The structure was construction used stones from various historical buildings (Church of St. Paul and Wiki).

The Parish House of the Church of St. Paul at 415 West 59th Street

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St.Paul_the_Apostle_Church(Manhattan)

The other building not to miss is the Williams J. Syms Operating Theater at 338 West 59th Street right behind the Time-Warner Complex. It was built in 1892 as a medical hospital and is the last remaining piece of the old Roosevelt Hospital by architects William Wheeler Smith and surgeon Charles McBurney. Made with marble and mosaic floors as not to harbor bacteria, it was considered state of the art when it opened. It is now being renovated for a school (Wiki and HDR Org).

William Syms Theater

William J. Syms Medical Theater

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/william-j-syms-operating-theatre

Turning the corner on West 59th Street at Tenth Avenue, you will face the beauty of the John Jay College of Criminology Haaren Building at 899 Tenth Avenue. The building is home to many classrooms and the library for the college. The building was designed by Charles B.J. Snyder and was completed in 1903 (Wiki and John Jay College). The building was originally the Dewitt Clinton High School.

John Jay College

John Jay College Haaren Building at 899 Tenth Avenue

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Jay_College_of_Criminal_Justice

The walk down Tenth Avenue was very different from other neighborhoods I had been recently. NoMAD, Rose Hill and Kips Bay were filled with historical architecture and embellished office buildings while this part of Midtown West/Hell’s Kitchen is filled with tenement housing, small theaters and restaurants. Unlike Ninth Avenue with its vibrant restaurant scene, Tenth Avenue is full of empty storefronts and closed restaurants with ‘For Rent’ signs. This is a sign of the times during the era of COVID.

One of the few patches of green in the neighborhood is the Hell’s Kitchen Park at thew corner at Tenth Avenue and West 48th Street. This park was created from a parking lot in 1966 when the neighborhood demanded green space for residents who lived here (NYCParks.org). The park was packed with families and kids playing basketball and running around the playground.

Hell's Kitchen Playground

Hell’s Kitchen Playground at Tenth Avenue and West 48th Street

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/hells-kitchen-park/highlights/7804

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell%27s_Kitchen_Park

It was strange to be in a neighborhood with such small buildings. Not just small buildings but so many ‘For Rent’ signs on the windows. I know this neighborhood will bounce back to the vibrant place it once was but it will take time. The traffic changed again when I got to West 42nd Street. There were most people walking around the streets.

A lot of the businesses on West 42nd Street heading back to the Port Authority have started opening up again. Sidewalk cafes were out with the warmer weather and customers were milling around.

One of my favorite Chinese restaurants from the 1990’s, Ollies at 411 West 42nd Street had not just opened their dining room but their outside cafe dining. Ollies had once been a popular restaurant in the Theater district at the corner of West 46th Street off Broadway and one of my favorite places to eat after work. It is still popular but the chef has since changed.

Ollies

Ollies at 411 West 42nd Street

https://ollieseats.com/ollies-sichuan

One building that stood out amongst the smaller tenement buildings of West 42nd Street was the Holy Cross Church at 329 West 42nd Street, which was decorated by plantings of many flowers that gave it a festive appearance.

Holy Cross Church

Holy Cross Church at 329 West 42nd Street

https://christinthecity.nyc/

The building has a interesting history. The parish was established in 1852 and the original building was built in 1852 but it was outgrown so a new building was built in 1854. This building was hit by lightning in 1867 and the current building was built in the same spot in 1870. It was built by architect Henry Englebert and is the oldest building on 42nd Street (Wiki and Holy Cross History).

Once I got back to Port Authority is was back for a bathroom break as there are not many public toilets in the neighborhood. Then I made the walk around the second time around the perimeter admiring the buildings and businesses for a second time. I could see by the traffic that the east side of Eighth Avenue was very quiet near the now closed theaters. This area was hit hard by COVID pandemic and it is rumored that Broadway theaters should open between September and December (we all hope) and the district will once again open.

When I reached West 58th again, I stopped at Amore Pizza Cafe at 370 West 58th Street for a quick slice. The pizza was pretty good and it was a nice sized slice of pizza. I had passed the place for years but never went into so it was another dining adventure (see review on TripAdvisor).

Amore Pizza Cafe

Amore Pizza Cafe at 370 West 58th Street

https://amorepizzacafe.com/

The pizza here is really good

After my snack, I continued the walk back down Tenth Avenue and stopped in Hell’s Kitchen Park to take some more notes. I swear the park got busier since visiting a few hours before. I made the turn on West 42nd Street and decided to walk up the length of Ninth Avenue and explore the Avenues of the neighborhood as well.

Just like Tenth Avenue, Ninth Avenue is filled with smaller tenement buildings, restaurants and small theaters and shops but being the heart of the Gay community, Ninth Avenue is much more vibrant. Most of the restaurants and outdoor cafes were filled the afternoon I visited the neighborhood. Being later in the evening, many people filled the bars and tables of the establishments and I noticed how many people were on top of each other and were not wearing masks. I thought this is a recipe for disaster but still it has a very vibrant restaurant scene.

In the midst of all the restaurants and bars on Ninth Avenue, there were only two that I have tried, Mom’s Kitchen & Bar at 701 Ninth Avenue for breakfast a few years before and Saccio Pizza at 819 Ninth Avenue for pizza one afternoon and it was pretty good.

Mon's Kitchen & Bar

Mom’s Kitchen & Bar at 701 Ninth Avenue

Sacco Pizza

Sacco Pizza at 819 Ninth Avenue

The one thing I remember about eating at Mom’s Kitchen & Bar that morning was the unusual menu they had for brunch. A friend and I shared an order of their Fruity Pebble Pancakes and their Mac & Cheese Pancakes and they were strange combinations but really tasted good especially the Mac & Cheese Pancakes with a honey syrup. It was an interesting breakfast.

Mom's

The Mac & Cheese Pancakes at Mom’s Kitchen & Bar are amazing

This is a neighborhood in a big transition now that the theaters are closed but I know brighter days are ahead as things open up soon. With the warmer weather and more vaccine coming, it will revert back to the neighborhood it was becoming. You can see this on a busy night at dinner time with restaurants filling up and people walking around with and without masks.

I am still wearing my mask around the City for now.

Check out the other walks of the Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton/Midtown West on this blog:

Walking the Border and Avenues of Hell’s Kitchen Day One Hundred and Ninety Four:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17414

Walking the Streets of Hell’s Kitchen Day One Hundred and Ninety Seven:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/17711

Walking the Borders of Hell’s Kitchen (Western Side) Day One Hundred and Ninety Nine:

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/18087

I had to split the neighborhood into two parts separated by 10th Avenue as there was so much to see and the complexity of the neighborhood changes on each side.

Places to Eat:

Stage Star Deli

105 West 55th #1

New York, NY 10019

(212) 541-4650

http://www.stagestardeli.com/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 6:00am-6:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d4369641-Reviews-Stage_Star_Deli-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/diningonashoestringinnyc.wordpress.com/2156

Amore Pizza Cafe

370 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019

(212) 581-4200

https://amorepizzacafe.com/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 10:00am-11:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d23336838-Reviews-Amore_Pizza-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Mom’s Kitchen & Bar

701 Ninth Avenue

New York, NY 10016

(646) 657-0080

https://www.momsmidtown.com/

Open: Sunday 8:00am-9:30pm/ Monday-Wednesday 9:00am-9:30pm/ Thursday-Friday 9:00am-10:30pm/ Saturday 8:30am-10:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d13199679-Reviews-Mom_s_Kitchen_Bar_The_Jolly_Monk-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Sacco Pizza

819 Ninth Avenue

New York, NY 10019

(212) 582-7765

http://www.saccopizza.com/

Open: Sunday Closed/Monday-Saturday 11:00am-8:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d459335-Reviews-Sacco_Pizza-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Ollies

411 West 42nd Street

New York, NY 10036

(212) 868-6588

https://ollieseats.com/ollies-sichuan

Open: Sunday-Thursday 11:30am-10:30pm/Friday-Saturday 11:30am-11:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d952664-Reviews-Ollie_s_Sichuan_Restaurant-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Peking Roast Duck

858 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019

(212) 459-3610/3607/8887

https://chefphopekingroastduck.netwaiter.com/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 11:00am-9:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d3459493-Reviews-Peking_Roast_Duck-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Real Kung Fu Steamed Buns Ramen

811 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019

(917) 338-2555

http://www.kfdelicacy.com/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 11:00am-9:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d6872074-Reviews-Kung_Fu_Little_Steamed_Buns_Ramen-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Places to Visit:

Myzel’s Chocolates

140 West 55th Street

New York, NY  10019

(212) 245-4233

http://www.myzels.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Myzels-Chocolates-332431326808571/

Open: Sunday Closed/Monday-Friday 11:00am-7:00pm/Saturday 12:00pm-5:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d3671775-Reviews-Myzel_s_Chocolate-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on LittleShoponMainStreet@Wordpress.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/littleshoponmainstreet.wordpress.com/556

Hell’s Kitchen Park

10 Avenue at West 46th Street

New York, NY 10036

(212) 639-9675

Open: 6:00am-10:00pm

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/hells-kitchen-park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/hells-kitchen-park/highlights/7804

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell%27s_Kitchen_Park

Museum of Arts & Design (MAD)

Jerome and Simona Chazen Building

2  Columbus Circle

New York City, NY  10019

(212) 299-7777

Open: Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm/Monday Closed/Tuesday-Saturday 10:00am-6:00pm

Fee: General $16.00/Seniors $14.00/Students $12.00/ Members Free

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d524927-Reviews-Museum_of_Arts_and_Design-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/visitingamuseum.com/2998

Underground Turnstyle Market

1000 South Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019

(646) 748-9222

https://www.turn-style.com/

Open: 24 Hours

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d11888820-Reviews-Turnstyle_Underground_Market-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Catherine Deli & Bagels 43 Catherine Street New York, NY 10038

Don’t miss this wonderful little deli for high quality meals at reasonable prices.

Catherine Deli & Bagels is located on the edge of Chinatown near the waterfront.

The breakfast sandwiches here are amazing!

Dining on a Shoe String in NYC

Catherine’s Deli & Bagels

43 Catherine Street

New York, NY 10038

(212) 285-1010

https://zmenu.com/catherine-deli-and-bagel-new-york-online-menu/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 6:00am-12:00am

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d23296551-Reviews-Catherine_s_Deli_And_Bagels-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Each neighborhood in New York City has its share of bodegas and delis that supply everything from grocery items, cleaning supplies and in some cases hardware items for last minute touch ups in apartments.

Where these stores differ from one another is their prepared food sections. This is where you can get your all day Bacon, Egg and Cheese sandwich on a hero roll to a Chopped Cheese (Two hamburgers chopped with spices and topped with American Cheese, chopped lettuce and chopped tomato) to the classic Bacon Cheese Burgers, Grilled Cheese and a variety of wraps.

I came across Catherine’s Deli & Bagels when touring Chinatown and I just stopped in to look around. I saw the sandwiches that were being made and what was on the grill…

View original post 355 more words

Al’s Deli 458 Seventh Avenue New York, NY 10123

Don’t miss this Garment Industry favorite for large portions and reasonable prices.

Don’t miss Al’s Deli a staple in NYC’s Garment District at 458 Seventh Avenue right across from Macy’s Herald Square.

The breakfast sandwiches here are amazing

Dining on a Shoe String in NYC

Al’s Deli

458 Seventh (Fashion) Avenue

New York, NY 10123

(212) 594-5682

https://www.alsdelinyc.com/

https://www.allmenus.com/ny/new-york/352502-als-delicatessen/menu/

Open Sunday-Saturday 24 Hours

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d2256292-Reviews-Al_s_Deli-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

It’s funny to return to a restaurant that had been part of your career twenty years earlier. In my years in the Macy’s Buying offices, Al’s Deli is entrenched in the memories of many Macy executives with early morning breakfasts before we had to be at the desk at 9:00am or in those late nights preparing for the holiday season after 8:00pm. Plus all those lunches being delivered when we were chained to our desks as the phones were ringing off the hook. Even when I visited the restaurant recently I still see their delivery people racing across the street delivering salads and sandwiches thinking nothing has changed over the years.

Al’s Deli has been serving the Garment District crowds since 1976 and its popularity is its…

View original post 391 more words

The Great Saunter Walk

Day One Hundred and Sixty-Seven: “The Great Saunter Walk”: Walking the Entire Rim of Manhattan-32 miles on my own-Father’s Day June 21, 2020 (Again on June 25th, 2021)

As New York City is just beginning to reopen during the COVID-19 Pandemic and trying to return to normal, I have been wondering Manhattan to see what changes have happened in those three months.  It is still incredible how much of the City is beginning to remind me of the mid-1970’s.

My trip in 2020 into lower Manhattan revealed a City looking circa 1980 with boarded up stores and graffiti all over the place. Walking around the neighborhoods in Midtown and Downtown last week were a real eye-opener on how pent-up frustration can almost destroy the fabric of a City and the underpinnings of human nature. It really showed just how frustrated everyone is with being sick, unemployed and broke.

Fifth Avenue Boarded up for Business

Fifth Avenue boarded up on June 15th, 2020

Even when the stores windows get fixed and the stores restocked, I don’t think people will forget that quickly. When you finally let people ‘out of their cages’ (i.e. their apartments) though you can see that compassion come back. This is what I saw on my thirty-two mile walk around the Island of Manhattan.

On my walk in 2021, the weather was just as spectacular as it was in 2020 but the mood of the City was different as things in Manhattan had been opened now for a year and the mask mandates were giving way to better days ahead. I saw so much interesting ‘public art’ all along my walk and ate at restaurants new and revisited from other blogs in the past six years. I felt like I was seeing old friends. I also took more time to look over artworks, explore parks and admire the views more on this beautiful day. There are better days ahead for New York City as it continues to morph and change.

Walking around the Island of Manhattan is no easy task. I had planned this since last year and made it my goal to do the walk on the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year. The problem was I had a ton of yard work to do on the first day of the summer and I had to get it done knowing that I would be tired after a walk like this. So after a day of trimming bushes and weeding the lawn, I put my game plan together for the next morning.

Since it was Father’s Day Sunday, I wanted to do something different and special to honor my father more than just sitting at a cemetery looking at an inscription. This is not something my father would want me to do. So my honoring him was to remind myself of all the wonderful Father’s Day’s we spent in Manhattan visiting museums, parks and going to see independent movies at the MoMA and the Angelica. After which we would dine at whatever restaurant I had seen in the Village Voice. Those were the days I wanted to remember.

The Great Saunter Walk III

My inspiration “The Great Saunter” by Cy V. Adler

‘The Great Saunter Walk’ had been cancelled this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic and would be held at a later date. The walk was started in 1984 by Mr. Cy A. Adler, who founded The Shorewalkers Inc., a non-profit environmental and walking group whose group was fighting for a public walkway since 1982. The first Saturday in May was designated as ‘Great Saunter Day’ (Wiki and Company founding) and has been recognized by most current Mayors of New York City.

Cy V. Adler

Cy V. Adler

I got the map of the walk off the internet and tried to figure out where to start. The walk starts at Frances Tavern in Lower Manhattan but I thought that was too far away. I thought of starting at 110th Street so I could get through Harlem faster but then I would be travelling back to 110 Street late at night so I nixed that.  Then I thought, I have to get off at 42nd Street for the Port Authority anyway and that is where I am at now with my walking project plus when I finish I will only be a few blocks away from the bus station so why not start there?

So in 2020 for my first walk, I started my walk around the Island of Manhattan at the Circle Line Boat Pier where I celebrated last year’s birthday.

The Circle Line II

The Circle Line is where I spent 2019’s birthday touring Manhattan by rivers

I took the 6:35am bus into New York to start early. During the week, the first bus comes at 5:30am and I would have liked to get more of head start but I wanted to do the walk on Father’s Day so into the City I went that morning. I got to the Pier by 7:07am and started the walk around the island.

The Circle Line was closed also because of COVID-19 so the Pier was quiet that morning. I looked over my map of Manhattan and started the walk along the pathways along the Hudson River going up the Joe DiMaggio Highway to the Henry Hudson Highway. I had not been to this part of the Manhattan in about two years.

When I decided to do the walk for a second time on June 25th, 2021, I put together a different game plan. With all the problems happening all over the City (shootings and harassments had been going up all over the City), I decided that I wanted to start earlier then I had the previous year and decided to spend the night before in Manhattan so I could get an earlier start.

I stayed at the Moxy Hotel in Chelsea at 105 West 28th Street in the heart of the Flower District and I have to say that the hotel has excellent views of the City.  I received a room on the tenth floor facing Sixth Avenue and at night I have to say it was one hell of a view. When the lights came on in the evening, the whole neighborhood twinkled.

Moxey Hotel

The Moxy Hotel at 105 West 28th Street

http://moxychelsea.com/

I got up at 5:00am that morning as the sun shined through the floor to ceiling windows (I wanted to get up early so I pulled the curtains back to see the sun) and got ready then checked the luggage, checked out and started my walk the second time at 6:15am.

The mood of the City was much different from the previous year with more businesses opening up and more people milling around the parks. Still the City was pretty quiet for most of the day especially as I reached uptown.

I started the walk in 2021 with a good breakfast at Chelsea Papaya at 171 West 23rd Street #1. I have passed this small hole in the wall restaurant for years on my walks around the neighborhood but had never eaten there. I had passed it the night before on my way back to the hotel and thought it would be a good to have breakfast before I started the walk in Riverside Park.

It was an amazing and filling breakfast of three pancakes, two scrambled eggs and three slices of bacon with a medium papaya drink for $11.00. The food was excellent and the guys working their at 6:15am could not have been nicer. The seating was not so hot with two small tables outside the restaurant where the tables and street could have used a good cleaning. Still it was a carb laden meal that prepared me for the long walk.

Featured Image -- 18411

Chelsea Papaya at 171 West 23rd Street

https://www.chelseapapayany.com/

Don’t miss the wonderful and filling breakfasts at Chelsea Papaya

I started the walk in 2021 on West 23rd Street, so I got to visit this side of the park during the day with it sweeping views of Jersey City and the Hudson River. When I started walking in the park at 6:30am, it was a beautiful sunny day but as the morning grew and I got to around West 42nd Street, the clouds started to roll in and it got cooler. That did not last long.

The first thing you will see when entering the park is the Monarch Waystation Garden that is one of many that have been planted around the rim of Manhattan. I have seen this also in east side parks as well.

Monarch Waystation

The Monarch Waystation Garden is as you enter Riverside Park

As I entered Hudson River Park, I noticed many works of art displayed on the fences and walls of the surrounding buildings. The 2021 NY Salt Exhibition was being displayed and I took some time to look over the works while walking through the park. I made may way from West 23rd Street and proceeded north walking near the river.

NY Salt

The NY Salt Exhibition at Hudson River Park in 2021

https://www.nycsalt.org/whatson

When you walk up past the Piers along Riverside Park in the 40’s, the first thing you will see in the next Pier over is the Intrepid Sea-Air Space Museum which was closed for the COVID-19 pandemic. Pier 86 where the ship was docked was really quiet that morning with only two people eating their breakfast on one of the tables in the little park near the ship. There were sweeping views of New Jersey across the river of Weehawken and West New York.

The Intrepid Sea-Air Museum

The Intrepid Sea-Air Museum is just reopened after being closed for almost a year

http://www.intrepidmuseum.org/

Most of the West Side is pathways along the river with views of New Jersey until you hit about West 50th Street when you get to the lower part of the new Hudson River Park that has been built on fill to create a new riverfront.

When I reached the park by Pier 96, I came across Malcolm Cochran’s artwork “Private Passage” again. I came across this sculpture when visiting the park two years earlier. The piece is a giant bottle and when you look in the port hole you will see a state room of the former Queen Mary. It is an interesting piece of artwork that is not hard to miss and take time to look in the port holes.

Private Passage

Private Passages in Hudson River Park

Malcolm Cochran artist

Artist Malcolm Cochran

About

The artist is originally from Pittsburgh, PA and is graduate of Wesleyan College who specializes in large sculptures.

Further up the park, I came across the old New York Transfer Station piece in Riverside Park. This is a relic of the old West Side Railroad tracks that were once part of the New York Central Railroad that the park and buildings behind it are built on. This  transfer bridge once was used to attach railroad cars to the freight tracks that once ran up and down this part of the island (Forgotten New York).

New York Central Transfer Bridge

The New York Central Transfer Station

It is interesting to see this now as a piece of art instead of a functioning part of the railroad but it is fascinating to see how we use the parts of the past as a piece of art in the present. This shows the current park visitor how we have made new uses of the riverfront for recreation and pleasure which was not true during the early parts of the last century.

As I was walking up through Riverside Park, I noticed a lot of artworks displayed in Riverside Park that were part of the ‘Summer 2021-Re: Growth’ art display that stretched from the West 40’s to 100’s at various points in the park. Some were interesting in design and it was nice to see a lot were from local New York Artists.

Regrowth

https://riversideparknyc.org/regrowth-riverside/

https://gothamist.com/arts-entertainment/riverside-park-unveiling-regrowth-public-art-exhibit-summer

These lined the length of Riverside Park and you had to really look for them. These were the works of art I viewed on the way up Riverside Park. I included the work and a short biography on each artist that I saw:

Double Arc Leaves and Lava

Letha Wilson

Artist Letha Wilson

https://www.lethaprojects.com/

Letha Wilson II

Ms. Wilson is a American artist who graduated from Syracuse with BFA and a MFA from Hunter College. She is a New York City based artist living in Brooklyn.

Happiness is….

Happiness is...

Artist Blanka Amezkua

https://www.blankaamezkua.com/

Blanka Amezkua

Ms. Amezkua is American born New York City based artist living in Bronx. A graduate of Cal State Fresno with a BA and also attended the Academia de belle Arte in Florence she is formally trained as a painter (Artist Bio).

Stuk

Stuk

Artist Dewitt Godfrey

https://www.dewittgodfrey.com/

Dewitt Godfrey

Mr. Godfrey is large scale sculptor from Hamilton, NY ho graduated from Yale University and his MFA from Edinburgh College of Art in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Four Currents

Four Currents II

Artist Wendy Letven

http://www.wendyletven.com/

Wendy Letven

Ms. Letven is an American born artist raised in Philadelphia with a BFA from the Tyler School of Art and a MFA from Hunter College and currently teaches at Parsons School of Design and Art and Design at New York University. She is a multidisciplinary artist in sculpture, installation and painting (Artist Bio).

Riverside Reading Room

riverside reading room

Artist Mary Mattingly

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Mattingly

Mary Mattingly

Ms. Mattingly is an American born artist currently living in New York City. She has a BFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art from Portland, OR and attended Parsons School of Design.  She is known for creating photos and sculptures representing futuristic and obscure landscapes (Wiki).

Last Steps

Last steps

Artist David Shaw

https://riversideparknyc.org/meet-the-regrowth-artists-david-shaw/

David Shaw

Mr. Shaw is a American born artist and a native New Yorker. He received his BA in Fine Arts from Colgate University. He is known for sculpture installation, photography and drawing.

Upstream DownStream

Upstream Downstream

Artist Shuli Sade

https://www.shulisade.com/

Shuli Sade artist

Ms. Sade is a Israeli artist currently living in New York City. Her mediums in art include photography, sculpture and drawing.

Swailing/ Snow Squall

Niki

Artist Niki Lederer

Home

niki lederer

Ms. Lederer is a Canadian born artist who lives in New York City and Newburgh, NY.  She has a BFA from the University of Victoria and a MFA from Hunter College.

Deliver Us

Deliver us

Artist Glen Wilson

https://www.biomythart.com/glen-wilson

Glen Wilson

Mr. Wilson is an American born artist from Los Angeles, CA. His medium is photography.

Ancient Rhoman Winged Figure

Ancient Rhoman Votive Statue

Regrowth

Artist Joshua Goode

https://www.joshuagoode.com/

Joshua Goode

Mr. Goode is an American born artist from Texas. He has a MFA from Boston University and has worked as an archaeologist on several digs Artsy Bio).

These works are on display until August 2021 and try not to miss this interesting display of art in this ‘open air museum’.

Hudson River Park and Riverside Park South blend into one another with the housing complexes behind them are a shining example of the uses of urban renewal and reclaiming our riverfront for pleasure and conservation. It is also one of the nicest new complexes built in Manhattan in recent years.

Riverside Park South

Riverside Park South

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/riverside-park-south

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d548731-Reviews-Riverside_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

What I love about this park is the nice pathways and lawns just to sit back and relax and enjoy the views. There are a lot of places to stop and rest. Since I had been to this side of the island two years ago, I continued my walk up to West 72nd Street when I got to the southern border of Riverside Park which runs much of this side of Manhattan.

I made it up to West Harlem Piers Park by 8:46am (7:43am in 2021)and made my first stop of the morning. The park was a mess. People must have been having parties in the park the night before and did not clean up after themselves because I could see a NYC Parks worker in the picking up the garbage and she did not look happy about the mess. Usually this park is pristine and I was not used to seeing it such a mess. I guess these are the things you see in New York City parks early in the morning. The efforts to keep them clean.

Harlem Pier Park

West Harlem Piers Park is a picturesque park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/west-harlem-piers/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d21085344-Reviews-West_Harlem_Piers_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html

The park is down the road from the new extension of the Columbia University campus extension so this park gets a lot of use during the school year. This early in the morning there were just a few joggers and one homeless guy who was throwing more garbage around. I did not want to be near the Parks worker when she had to deal with that.

What I had not noticed on my trips to the park in the past were some unusual sculptures by artist Nari Ward, a New York based artist who likes to use objects found in his own neighborhood (artist website).

Artist Nari Ward

Artist Nari Ward

https://www.nariwardstudio.com/

These unusual silver sculptures I almost interpreted as people trying to speak and it was interesting that the sculptures were called Voice I and Voice II. I was not sure of what the artist was trying to communicate with his artwork but it does stand out in the park. The unfortunate part of it was that there was so much garbage in the park you could not get up close to see them.

Voice One

Voice I

Voice II

Voice II

I really enjoy this park. It has wonderful breezes and excellent views and plenty of places to sit down and relax. It offers such nice views of the river and as the morning progressed I started to see more sailboats and water boats out cruising up and down the Hudson River.

I reached the bottom of the George Washington Bridge by 9:36am and watched an artist putting a display of layered rocks along the Hudson River shore. Uliks Gryka the artist behind the “Sisyphus Stones” that line this part of the park was carefully layering stones one on top of another and fixing and creating new formations. It was interesting to watch how he balanced each of the stones into a new work. The artist is originally from Albania and has no formal art training (Artist website).

Sisyphus Stones

The Sisyphus Stones on the Hudson River

Artist Uliks Gryka

Artist Uliks Gryka

https://www.linkedin.com/in/uliks-gryka-a76071171

The work reminded me of the Moai on Easter Island, the  famous statues that faced the sea. It made me think how the artwork looks to the river and how maybe it is nature communicating with land and sea. I was not sure the message the artist was trying to portray and he looked too busy working to ask him. The artwork was still there in 2021 and it looked like the artist was still updating it.

I continued on into Fort Washington Park to see the Little Red Lighthouse, which I had not visited in almost three years since my last walk in the neighborhood. Many tourists were by the site just under the George Washington Bridge, taking pictures by the lighthouse and enjoying the sunny weather.

Little Red Lighthouse

The Little Red Lighthouse

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/fort-washington-park/highlights/11044

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d2368581-Reviews-Little_Red_Lighthouse-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/visitingamuseum.com/300

The Little Red Lighthouse had been constructed in 1889 and moved from Sandy Hook, New Jersey in 1917 and moved here in 1921. It was decommissioned in 1948 after the construction of the George Washington Bridge in 1931. What had saved the lighthouse from destruction was the book “The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge” by author Hildegarde Swift in 1942 (Wiki).

Little Red Lighthouse II

The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge by Hildegarde Swift

I didn’t stay long by the lighthouse because it was loaded with tourists taking pictures but I did stay by the tables and enjoy the view of the George Washington Bridge. It was making quite the racket as more cars are travelling over it again and on a sunny day offered some dazzling views. The breezes were amazing! In 2021, the lighthouse and the park were really quiet so I got to enjoy the views on my own this time.

Walking up the stairs to get to the upper level of the park is not for the faint hearted and I saw many people much younger than me get out of breath on their way up. One guy had to be about twenty and he looked like he needed oxygen. To me it was just a walk up and I continued to walk through the lower part of Fort Washington Park. In 2021, I could not believe how in much better shape I was that I handled it better.

This part of the park faces Englewood Cliffs, NJ and the Palisades Park Highway on the other side of the river. There is no construction on that park of the river so it offers views on the cliffs and the woods that line it.

Englewood Cliffs, NJ

The view of Englewood Cliffs, NJ

As I walked further up into the park, it was mostly wooded highway and further up the hill was Fort Tyron Park and the home of The Cloister Museum which is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The museum has been closed since March but I had taken one of the last of the guided tours on religious flora in art of the Middle Ages before it closed on March 13th.

Cloisters III

Fort Tryon Park and The Cloisters Museum in the park

Fort Tryon Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/fort-tryon-park

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d2305249-Reviews-Fort_Tryon_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/visitingamuseum.com/4350

The Cloisters-The Metropolitan Museum of Art

https://www.metmuseum.org/visit/plan-your-visit/met-cloisters

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d106609-Reviews-The_Met_Cloisters-New_York_City_New_York.html

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://visitingamuseum.com/tag/the-cloisters-museum/

When you reach Fort Tyron Park by foot along the Henry Hudson Parkway, you will see two large stone columns that look like the entrance to an estate and then across the street there is a pillared overlook to the Hudson River. These are remnants of  the former C.K.G. Billings estate,  “Tryon Hall”.

Tyron Hall entrance

The old entrance to the estate is covered with brush

Mr. Billings, the Chairman of Union Carbide, owned most land of which the park is located and theses small relics are the remains of the great estate. I had never been in this part of the park before and thought it interesting that these pieces of the estate were left.

Tryon Hall Estate

The “Tryon Hall” estate of C.K.G. Billings.

CKG Billings

Cornelius Kingsley Garrison Billings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._K._G._Billings

The History of the Estate:

https://untappedcities.com/2021/03/03/remnants-billings-estate-fort-tryon/

http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-lost-billings-mansion-tryon-hall.html

The archway and drive are still part of the park and you can see them closer to The Cloisters Museum. The old driveway to the estate is still used inside the park.

I travelled up further and arrived at the Dyckman Beach Park located at the end of Dyckman Avenue in Inwood. This tiny little beach is hidden from the road and is located next to the pier. Every time I have visited the park, this little section is in high demand for picnickers and you have to get there early. The pier is a nice place to relax and soak of the sun and admire the view.

Dyckman Beach Picture

Don’t miss this tiny beach and the pier. It is so relaxing!

In 2021, the beach area was busy with a local high school graduation going on in the restaurant right next to the beach. There was much cheering and celebrating going on and it was good to see that. All along the harbor deck, people were relaxing and fishing.

In 2020, I walked around one side of the park that contains the soccer field where a very heated match between two teams was taking place. I could tell there was a heated discussion in Spanish that these two teams were in major competition.  While the men were playing soccer, the ladies were cooking up a storm, making skewers of meat, cutting fresh fruit and stirring lemonade for a makeshift concession stand. This was a very organized league.

I walked around the field and watched the game as the families settled in for a long afternoon. These guys really took the game seriously and were going back and forth side to side for the twenty minutes I watched the game. The pathway to the park ends in a semi-circle and on the side is a walkway bridge over the railroad tracks which will take you around Inwood Hill Park to the lower pathways that overlook the Hudson River and to the Henry Hudson Bridge that leads to the Bronx.

In 2021, the fields were very quiet which I was surprised by. Usually this area is very crowded with people even when COVID was at its height. It was better to be outside than inside. It was earlier in the morning.

When you follow the path, it leads to the Spuyten Duyvil, a man-made canal that was created during the Dutch era for shipping and trade. It cuts off a small section of Manhattan that is now on the Bronx side of the City. Here you will see the giant blue “C” for Columbia University, whose stadium is on the other end of the park.

Columbia C

The Columbia “C” from Inwood Hill Park

The paths lead down wooded areas that are some of the last of the ‘virgin’ forest left on the island of Manhattan and one of the few true wooded areas.

Inwood Hill Park

The pathways in Inwood Hill Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/inwood-hill-park

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d3598044-Reviews-Inwood_Hill_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

When you exit the pathways into the lawn area of the park, you are greeted by a giant boulder which is one of the most historic objects on the Island of Manhattan, the Shorakkopoch Rock. The rock is the legendary location of where Peter Minuit bought Manhattan from the Reckgawawang Indians for what is today $24.00 of household goods and trinkets.

Shorakkopoch Rock

The Shorakkopoch Rock in Inwood Hill Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/inwood-hill-park/monuments

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d21055143-Reviews-Shorakkopoch_Rock-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/visitingamuseum.com/1240

On the other side of the small cove is the natural cove, Muscota Marsh where the Columbia Rowing Team has their sheds. The Muscota Marsh was created in a joint partnership between the NYC Parks system and Columbia University. This one acre marsh is located in the Spuyten Duyvil creek and is part freshwater and part salt-water marsh. It is home to many native birds who use it as a nesting and watering site.

Muscota Marsh

The Muscota Marsh on the edge of Inwood Hill Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/highlights/muscota-marsh

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d21055137-Reviews-Mucota_Marsh-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/visitingamuseum.com/1214

I sat and relaxed while birds flew in and out of the marsh that morning. It was the most beautiful sunny morning and you could feel the cool breezes coming off the creek while small boats passed by. The Muscota Marsh is one of those hidden treasures in Manhattan that tourists rarely visit. It was nice to just sit and relax. I had reached the northern most part of Manhattan by 11:11am four hours after the start time.

In 2020, I had eaten a light breakfast at the house and had gone through my snacks while walking up to Inwood Hill Park. Most of the places I had gone to in the past while up walking the neighborhood or going to the Columbia/Cornell football games were closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic or went out of business. I ordered breakfast from Park Terrace Deli at 510 West 218 Street.

Park Terrace Deli

Park Terrace Deli at 510 West 218 Street

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Fast-Food-Restaurant/Park-Terrace-Deli-115609725127285/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d4636946-Reviews-Park_Terrace_Deli-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

I had the most amazing Bacon, Egg and Cheese on a Hero that hit the spot. I was starved and this large sandwich fit the bill. It was loaded with freshly cooked bacon and the hero roll was toasted and then pressed when the bacon, cheese and eggs were loaded inside. I sat down with a much needed Coke in the benches by Isham Park further down Broadway. I enjoyed every bite and the ice cold Coke gave me the burst of energy I needed to continue the walk down the western part of Manhattan.

Bacon, Egg and Cheese sandwich

The Bacon, Egg and Cheese sandwich at Park Terrace Deli is excellent!

In 2021, I was still full from my breakfast at Chelsea Papaya and stopped in Twin Donut at 5099 Broadway (now closed) for a donut. I have been to this shop many times when walking in the neighborhood and their donuts are delicious. I had one of their Blueberry jelly filled ($1.50) and that hit the spot. The owner said that they were selling the business after sixty years and it would soon be a twelve story building.

Twin Donut

Twin Donut was at 5099 Broadway for almost 60 years

https://www.facebook.com/TwinDonutOnFordhamRd/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d4688490-Reviews-Twin_Donut-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

In 2021, I stopped at G’s Coffee Shop for the same breakfast sandwich and as usual, the food and service was excellent, feeding my weary body.

G's Coffee Shop

G’s Coffee Shop at 634 West 207th Street

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Coffee-Shop/Gs-Coffee-Shop-205601462950934/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d17445018-Reviews-G_s_Coffee_SHop-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com:

G’s Coffee Shop 634 West 207th Street New York, NY 10034

After breakfast, I travelled down 10th Avenue from 218th Street and followed the path of the original footprint of the island until I arrived at the cross streets of Dyckman Street and Harlem River Drive at the beginning of Highbridge Park and Sherman Cove. Even in this busy area of car repair shops, small restaurants and the Dyckman Houses, everyone pretty much ignored me as if I was not there. Not one person looked at me. Many people looked down as I passed which I thought was strange.

In 2020, most of this part of Highbridge Park was still closed off to the public because of the COVID-19 pandemic and because it was Father’s Day, people were barbecuing along the thin path and patch of land between the park and the highway. It amazes me how creative these residents are with the use of space.

In 2021, the Sherman Creek part of the park was open for walking through and I took the time to walk the path to the river through the winding woods and streams. It is a nice break from the busy City and it a very underrated part of Highbridge Park. The views of the East River were spectacular and the the breezes were so nice and cool. It was nice to have the park to myself that morning.

Sherman Cove

Sherman Creek Park/Swindlers Cove is at 351 West 205th Street

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/sherman-creek-park

Sherman Creek Park

Before I took the long trip down Harlem River Drive along the rim of High Bridge Park, I walked along Dyckman Street, one of the three big retail corridors for the Dominican community in Washington Heights. The other two being 207th Street and the other 181st Street and Broadway.

Dyckman Street on the west side of Broadway is so alive on the weekends with street vendors selling food and wares, music playing and people socializing with their neighbors. I love coming here for the bakeries and to get fresh pastilitoes and freshly squeezed juice from the street vendors who have to listen to my broken Spanish. It was a little tougher to visit the places as social distancing let less people into the stores that were open.

Dyckman Street Vendors

On warm weekends Dyckman Street is alive with shoppers

After I walked a few blocks of Dyckman Street to see what was available, I started the long trek down the path along Harlem River Drive with High Bridge Park across the street. The long curves of the park, the lush woods and rock formations show what was once the former shoreline of this part of the island. From this location it looks alike Inwood Hill Park with clean paths and virgin plantings.

High Bridge Park IV

High Bridge Park in Washington Heights

https://www.nycgovparks.org/park-features/highbridge-park/planyc

The reality of the park is that if you walk through the park you are faced with the over-grown paths, the graffitied rocks and garbage that parts of the park suffer from. When you walk through the paths on the other side of the park, you see how far the park has gone down and the work that still needs to be done. Abandoned cars and garbage still plaque parts of the park from the park side paths. Still the City is doing a lot to improve the park.

I passed the old High Bridge Water Tower that was being renovated and was covered in scaffolding. The water tower and the bridge are the lasting remnants of the way water used to travel into New York City from upstate in the late 1800’s. The tower was built in 1872 and was part of the old Croton Aqueduct system of moving water into Manhattan. The tower and the surrounding area is currently going under renovation and the pool is closed because of COVID-19.

Water Tower at High Bridge Park

High Bridge Water Tower

https://www.nycgovparks.org/planning-and-building/capital-project-tracker/project/5937

My review on TripAdvisor:

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/block-edtor/post/visitingamuseum.com/4467

This part of the park had no activity and on the path leading down to the old Polo Grounds there was not much activity. What always makes me nervous is walking around the Polo Ground Houses that run from West 165th Street to about West 155th Street. The complex is a tired looking set up public housing with one building looking exactly like the other and a small patch of green in the middle. I could see from the hill over-looking the lawns that there were some small parties going on.

Polo Ground Towers

The Polo Ground Tower Housing Complex

Click to access Polo%20Grounds%20Towers.pdf

All I kept thinking about is the activities that go on there and I zig-zagged my way down the sidewalk until I hit the part of the fence that was covered with trees and vines. Out of site from the prying windows. Ever since I read about the complex on the internet, I have never felt comfortable in this part of the City. This was before I walked all around the complex four years ago when I walked Harlem and didn’t think much about it. I walk around quickly in this neighborhood.

I crossed the street and walked down Edgecombe Avenue on the upper side of Jackie Robinson Park.  On the corner of the edge of the street is the John Hooper Fountain at 155th Street and Edgecombe Avenue. The fountain was designed by architect George Martin Huss and is a ornamental horse fountain and lantern. It was dedicated in 1894 and donated to the park by businessman John Hooper (NYCParks.com/MichaelMinn.net). It was used by the horses for drinking when carriages and horse riding at that time.

Hooper Fountain

The John Hooper Fountain is at the corner of Edgecombe Avenue and 155th Street

https://michaelminn.net/newyork/parks/hooper-fountain/index.html

https://www.nycgovparks.org/art-and-antiquities/permanent-art-and-monuments/info?monId=741

As I walked past the fountain and entered the edge of Jackie Robinson Park I could hear music and kids screaming from the sidewalk. The park was alive with people using the playground or setting up parties for Father’s Day. It was also a mixed crowd of people who were conversing amongst themselves about recent events and I heard many lively debates.

The one thing I discovered about this section of the park is that everything across the street or closer to the park is brand new housing, a lot catering to CUNY students. Much of Bradhurst and Fredrick Douglas Boulevard have been knocked down and rebuilt with new housing and much of West 145th Street is new stores and restaurants. It changes as you get closed to Lenox Avenue and Young Park.

Jackie Robinson Park I

Jackie Robinson Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/jackie-robinson-park_manhattan

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d21085366-Reviews-Jackie_Robinson_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html

I find Jackie Robinson Park very nice. The park has always been well maintained and the place was clean and well-landscaped. During the warmer months of the school year, a lot of CUNY students can be seen on the hill as you enter the park on West 145th Street sunning themselves and studying. Now families were setting up barbecues unfortunately many of them without masks.

The worst thing I found about travelling in these blocks of the City in 2020 is how the Parks system treats the patrons of the parks. There was not one open bathroom in the four parks that I visited. High Bridge Park had no bathrooms on the Harlem River Drive part of the park, both Jackie Robinson Park’s bathrooms were shut tight and Young Park’s were also closed. Thomas Jefferson Park further down only had Porto toilets (and I will not mention in this blog the condition they were in. COVID-19 would not even survive in those). In 2021, there were more bathrooms open but not in great shape.

After a rest in Jackie Robinson Park, I ventured down West 145th Street to Young Park and then crossed down Malcolm X Boulevard to West 143rd Street.  There were no open bathrooms here so I headed down Fifth Avenue before making the connection on to Harlem River Drive.

In 2021, I stopped for a quick lunch at Sweet Mama’s Soul Food Restaurant at 698 Malcolm X Boulevard on the corner of Lexington Avenue and 145th Street. It was a little too hot for such heavy food but I thought why not? I had not had Southern food in a long time.

I tried the Fried Chicken wings, Mac & Cheese, Sweet Potatoes and a biscuit with a Coke. The food is served buffet style and bought by the pound. My ‘little’ meal with beverage was $9.00 and I thought that was a bargain for all that food. The fried chicken tasted delicious but had been sitting in the steamer too long but the biscuit, sweet potatoes and mac & cheese were all excellent and full of flavor. Refreshed from my lunch, I carried on down Malcolm X Boulevard (Lexington Avenue). Don’t bother with the public bathrooms at Carl Young Park across the street. They are not clean.

Sweet Mama's

Sweet Mama’s Soul Food at 698 Malcolm X Boulevard

https://www.facebook.com/Sweetmamasoulfood/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d10167991-Reviews-Sweet_Mama_s_Soul_Food_Restaurant_Salad_Bar-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

As I made my way down Fifth Avenue from 143rd Street, I stopped for a moment to look at a obelisk that I had not noticed the last time I had visited the area. The obelisk is located on a tiny triangle near the corner of Fifth Avenue and  West 142nd Street. The Monument is the 369 Infantry Regiment Memorial dedicated to the all black unit that fought so valiantly in World War I with the Fourth French Army. It was in such an obscure place that I must have just passed it when I visited Harlem. The drunk homeless guy sitting next to it was a deterrent from really looking at it.

369 Infantry Regiment Memorial

The 369th Infantry Regiment Memorial

https://www.nycgovparks.org/about/history/historical-signs/listings?id=19562

I crossed over the triangle and continued to follow the river to West 135th street ( the river walk ends at West 135th Street and continued down Madison Avenue. I had to walk through the Lincoln Houses Public Housing and again pretty much everyone avoided me.  I was surprised that there was so much garbage on the lawns and in the parks. I could not believe that none of the residents would have picked this up. As I walked down Madison Avenue, I noticed another homeless guy trying to solicit money from people coming off the highway and almost getting hit a few times. I was going to yell at him but I thought I better mind my business walking in this section of the City.

I made a turn into the courtyard of the Lincoln Houses to see the statute of Abraham Lincoln with Child statute at  2120-2122 Madison Avenue. With all the statutes being torn down in 2020, I was surprised that not only was this statute up but in good shape.

lincoln Statute

Lincoln and Child at 2120-2122 Madison Avenue in the Lincoln Houses

https://jubiloemancipationcentury.wordpress.com/2015/07/07/monument-lincoln-and-child-harlem-new-york/#:~:text=and%20the%20Nadir-,Monument%3A%20%E2%80%9CLincoln%20and%20Child%2C%E2%80%9D%20Harlem%2C,New%20York%2C%20by%20Charles%20Keck&text=New%20York%20%E2%80%94%20Tribute%20was%20paid,Abraham%20Lincoln%20Housing%20project%20here.

The statue was designed by artist Charles Keck. Mr. Keck was an American born New York artist who studied at the National Academy of Design and the Arts Students League of New York. He  was best known for his work on statues and monuments.

Charles Keck artist

Artist Charles Keck

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Keck

I walked south down Madison Avenue until I reached West 128th Street and walked towards the river towards Second Avenue.  I stopped in Harlem River Park and Crack is Wack Playground and again no open bathrooms and I passed the Tri-Boro Plaza Park nothing there either so I just continued down Second Avenue to East 120th Street and walked down Pleasant Avenue towards Thomas Jefferson Park. The park was pretty busy in both 2020 and 2021 with kids playing baseball or running around the park.

While walking around Harlem River Park, I came across the artwork “Dream Fulfilled”, which was unveiled in August of 2011 as a partnership between the Harlem CDC, their State and City Partners, East, Central,  and West Harlem Committees and the Creative Arts Workshop for Kids (CAW) (Empire State Development).

caw2011muralhrpinvite_1_orig

The project “Dreams Fulfilled” in 2011

As I walked down Second Avenue from 125th Street, I noticed interesting artwork on the side of the Taino Towers at 221 East 122nd Street. The towers had been going through a major renovation the last time I had visited the neighborhood and parts of the complex were still under scaffolding.

Artist Don Rimx painted a mural of Nuyorocan poet Jesus ‘Tato’ Laviera. The painting had been unveiled in 2017 (long after my visit to the neighborhood) and 123rd Street was renamed after the poet (Street Art NYC).

images

The mural of Jesus ‘Tato’ Laviera at Taito Towers at 122nd Street and Second Avenue

Artist Don Rimx

Don Rimx

https://donrimx.com/

https://www.instagram.com/donrimx/?hl=en

Mr. Rimx was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico and in 2009 moved to Brooklyn and then in 2014 to Florida. He graduated from Central High School of Visual Arts and Escuela Des Arts Plasticas. He is known for his use of styles in art and culture and known for his murals (Artist Bio).

As I passed the towers and its new artwork, I crossed Second Avenue to the Wagner Houses complex. People were having all sorts of picnics and barbecues inside and outside the Wagner Houses and people were celebrating Father’s Day in full force. It was all I could do from walking through the complex again. The last time I did that the residents looked at me like I was a Martian who just set down.

Wagner Houses

The Wagner Houses

Click to access Wagner.pdf

Robert Wagner Sr. Statue

The Robert Wagner Sr. sculpture in the Wagner Playground by artist Georg John Lober

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/wagner-playground/monuments/1642

Georg Lober

Artist Georg John Lober

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_J._Lober

Georg John Lober was an American artist from Chicago who studied at the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design and worked for the New York City Municipal Art Commission for seventeen years.

As I walked around the Wagner Complex, little had changed from my various trips in this part of the neighborhood except they finished a lot of the luxury housing across the street. The complexity and diversity of the neighborhood was changing fast right before COVID hit and in the 2021 trip, it is still changing.

Pleasant Avenue was once home to the East Harlem “Little Italy” and the ‘Dance of the Giglio’ takes place here every August outside the Shrine Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (See Day Eighty-Four The Feast of Our Lady of Carmel and the Dancing of the Giglio). Now it is becoming a gentrified neighborhood and I saw many people eating in outdoor cafes or shopping at the local mall. I stopped at Pleasant Finest Deli at 375 Pleasant Avenue in both 2020 and 2021 for a snack and a Coke. On a 84 degree day there is nothing like an ice cold Coke. This is my ‘go-to’ place when I am in the neighborhood for snacks.

Pleasant Finest Deli at 375 Pleasant Avenue

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d12379766-Reviews-Pleasant_Finest_Deli-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

MywalkinManhattan.com-Day Eighty-Four

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/5980

I stopped for lunch in both 2020 and 2021 at Blue Sky Deli (now Harlem Taste Deli) at 2135 First Avenue for a Chopped Cheese. I swear I make any excuse to come up here and have that sandwich.

Blue Sky Deli

The Blue Sky Deli has a cult following

https://www.instagram.com/hajjis110/?hl=en

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d12328617-Reviews-Blue_Sky_Deli-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com:

https://wordpress.com/post/diningonashoestringinnyc.wordpress.com/74

The ‘Chopped Cheese’ is a cult sandwich made up of two chopped hamburgers topped with American cheese, chopped lettuce and tomato with salt, pepper and spices and then pressed. It is like heaven with every bite. I took my sandwich into Thomas Jefferson Park, which is currently under renovation and ate my sandwich. After I was finished, I had the energy to continue the walk downtown.

In 2021, I wanted to make up for time and ate it when I got to Carl Schulz Park near East 84th Street. I figured I had eaten enough by that point and could save it for later. I had to have a chopped cheese that day.

Chopped Cheese

The Chopped Cheese Sandwich at Blue Sky Deli (Harlem Taste Deli)

After I finished my lunch I felt refreshed and ready to go but still had to find a bathroom. Since the park was under renovation, there were only Porto bathrooms and trust me, STAY AWAY! They were so dirty that COVID-19 could not survive these things. After eating a big lunch, I ended up nauseous for the rest of the afternoon and lost my appetite for anything else.  I left the park at 3:48pm and thought I was making good time.

Before I left Thomas Jefferson Park, I came across another piece of art that I had not noticed on my many visits to the park. The sculpture located in the middle of the park is entitled “Tomorrow’s Wind” by artist Melvin Edwards. The sculpture is made of welded steel and is tilted so that it reflects the sun. The piece was placed in the park in 1995 (NYCParks.org).

Tomorrow's Wind

“Tomorrows Wind” in Thomas Jefferson Park

Artist Melvin Edwards

Melvin Edwards

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mel_Edwards

https://www.artsy.net/artist/melvin-edwards

Mr. Edwards is a American born artist from Texas. He is known for his known for his abstract steel sculptures. He graduated with a BFA from University of Southern California and studied at the Los Angeles Art Institute.

I exited the park at West 111th Street and followed the overpass over FDR Drive and and walked down the esplanade from West 111th Street to West 60th Street in Sutton Place. The views of the Harlem and East Rivers are ever changing with new construction in Queens and Brooklyn and the developments on Randall’s-Ward  and Roosevelt Island. The whole riverfront changes every year.

Roosevelt Tram

The Tram to Roosevelt Island

Between the sunny skies and cool river breezes, it is an amazing walk if you take your time like I did and just soak up the sunshine. I never realized how easy this part of the walk would be. I just walked others walk by enjoying their afternoons and looked at all the buildings going up and the boats and jet skiers passing by. It was one busy river.

I relaxed when I arrived at Carl Schurz Park to enjoy the views of Lighthouse Park on Roosevelt Island and look at the flower beds in the park. Carl Schurz Park has its own Friends group and they do a great job taking care of the park. The flower beds are so colorful and vibrant and the playground is full of active screaming kids. There were finally some decent OPEN bathrooms and the water fountains here work and the water is good. The fountains dispense cold water and New York City water tastes good especially at these water fountains.

Carl Schurz Park IV

Carl Schurz Park on East End Avenue

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/carl-schurz-park

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d312015-Reviews-Carl_Schurz_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on VisitingaMuseum.com:

https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/visitingamuseum.com/2714

In 2020, I stayed at the park for about a fifteen minutes. Any longer and I would not have left. Carl Schurz Park is one of my favorite parks in Manhattan. I love the views, the sights and sounds of this park and love how lively and calm it is at the same time. It is a true neighborhood park.

In 2021, I just relaxed in the park, ate my chopped cheese sandwich (which I could tell people around me envying) and watched the boats and jet skiers pass by. I also had a direct view of Lighthouse Park on Roosevelt Island so I got to watch everyone visit the little lighthouse at the tip of the island. Outside of of Bryant Park in Midtown, I find Carl Schulz Park one of the best parks in the City to relax and just people watch and let nature encompass you.

I continued down the river front walk until I had to stop at West 60th on the border of the Upper East Side and Sutton Place and proceeded up the ramp. This is where the sculpture by artist Alice Aycock is located and one of my favorite ‘street art’ sculptures ‘East River Roundabout’.

East River Roundabout

East River Roundabout at East 60th Street

Alice Aycock

Artist Alice Aycock

https://www.aaycock.com/

From here I travelled up the ramp which surrounds Twenty-Four Sycamores Park which borders both neighborhoods and is extremely popular with the neighborhood children and their babysitters and parents. The park was closed though because of the COVID-19 pandemic but will be reopened soon. This park was start and stop point when I was visiting this side of town for the blog. I like the shade trees and it has good bathrooms.

24 Sycamore Park

Twenty-Four Sycamores Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/twenty-four-sycamores-park

I walked down Sutton Place past the old mansions and stately apartment buildings. This area of the City was really quiet as the residents here were probably out of town with all that was going on. The streets were pretty much deserted and I saw a few people in Sutton Place Park. Please check out my walk of the Sutton Place/Beekman Place neighborhood on my blog:

Day One Hundred and Thirty-Four: Walking Sutton Place

https://wordpress.com/post/mywalkinmanhattan.com/8713

Sutton Place

Sutton Place has a quiet elegance about it

Sutton Place Park

Sutton Place Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/sutton-place-park

Watch taking the turn on East 53rd Street to First Avenue. The cars and cabs will not stop for you when you try to cross the street so be careful. I always take a mad dash across the road.

From here you have to walk on First Avenue from East 53rd Street until East 37th Street as the United Nations dominates this area. The United Nations looked like it was closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic with just a few guards on duty and not much traffic. It also looked to me like they removed a lot of their statuary because of all the vandals destroying art work all over the country.

UN Building II

The United Nations Complex

I stopped in Ralph Bunche Park at First Avenue between East 42nd and 43rd Street. I just needed to sit for a bit and I admired a sculpture that I had not noticed before when walking the park.

Ralph Bunche Park

Ralph Bunche Park at First Avenue between East 42nd and 43rd Streets

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/ralph-bunche-park

The park was named after the first black American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. The interesting sculpture in the park was created by artist Daniel Larue Johnson entitled “Piece Form One”.

Piece form One

“Piece Form One” by Daniel Larue Johnson

Artist Daniel Larue Johnson

Daniel Larue Johnson

https://www.artforum.com/news/daniel-larue-johnson-1938-2017-69684

Mr. Johnson was an American born artist from California. He studied at the Chouinard Art Institute and then studied in Paris. He was known for his abstract paintings and steel sculptures.

Another interesting piece of art was on the wall of 777 First Avenue, the Church Center for the United Nations. The work was created by artist Benoit Gilsoul and is entitled “Man’s Search for Peace” (Wiki).

Church for the Center of the United Nations

The Church Center for the United Nations at 777 First Avenue

Artist Benoit Gilsoul

Benoilt Gilsoul

https://www.artsy.net/artist/benoit-gilsoul

https://www.1stdibs.com/art/drawings-watercolor-paintings/abstract-drawings-watercolors/benoit-gilsoul-benoit-gilsoul-out-bowels-earth-charcoal-pastel-on-paper/id-a_7173422/

Mr. Gilsoul was a Belgium born artist who immigrated to the United States in 1967 and became an American citizen. He studied at the Académie Royale des Beaux Arts in Belgium. He was noted for his abstract works (IstDibs.com).

I then exited East 37th Street and continued to walk down the esplanade along the East River. I had never travelled to this section of the City before (I have currently not passed 42nd Street on my current walk of Manhattan) so it was an adventure to see new views of the island. I stayed on this pathway until I got to the Battery.

Along the way between East 37th Street and East 11th Streets, you tend to see the backs of a lot of buildings on the Manhattan side life Bellevue and the Tisch Hospital. You then pass Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village and then the Con Ed Power Plant so there is not much to see on this side but from the other side you will see the skyline of Long Island City and Downtown Brooklyn.

Downtown Long Island City

Downtown Long Island City keeps changing

On the turn before you get to the larger East River Park is the smaller Stuyvesant Cove Park which was once the site of an old cement plant and has now been reclaimed for a riverfront park. The park runs from about East 22nd Street to East 18th Street. The park is planted with native plants of New York City and has become a haven for birds and butterflies (Stuyvesant Cove Park Association). I left Stuyvesant Cove by 5:45pm in 2020 and 6:30pm in 2021. I took more time to explore the parks and artwork in 2021.

Stuyvesant Cove Park

Stuyvesant Cove Park

https://untappedcities.com/2017/07/25/the-top-10-secrets-of-stuyvesant-cove-park/

Home

Around East 12th Street its best to the follow the path signs to John V. Lindsay East River Park. The park was created in 1939 by then Parks Director Robert Moses on reclaimed land from the waterfront and piers and is a 57.5 acre point of relief to the residents of the Lower East Side (Wiki).

The park has many recreational facilities and the afternoon I was walking through countless parties and barbecues were going on. With meats sizzling on the grills and water gun fights and the sound of music throughout the park, people were enjoying their Father’s Day celebrations in every corner of the park. I found open bathrooms that were clean and a water fountain that worked and I was happy. Don’t miss the giant anchor facing the river near the entrance to the park.

John V. Lindsay East River Park

John V. Lindsay East River Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/east-river-park

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d5961005-Reviews-John_V_Lindsay_East_River_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Anchors Away

Don’t miss the “Anchors Away” sculpture in John Lindsey Park

Once I left the park, I was on my way to South Street Seaport. This part of the walk meant walking under overhangs, bridge over-passes and the housing was a combination of new and old construction. On the other side of the river, there is a difference on the riverfront on the Brooklyn side. The growth of DUMBO and Downtown Brooklyn has changed the whole look from this side of the river.

Downtown Brooklyn

Downtown Brooklyn from the Brooklyn Bridge

This is now becoming some of the most expensive housing in New York City with warehouses and old factories becoming expensive lofts. Things just changing on that side of the river and the riverfront even this far down keeps changing. I passed the Peck Slip Park at 6:30pm on my way to the South Street Seaport.

Peck Slip

Peck Slip Park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/peck-slip

South Street Seaport is some of the original structures of Lower Manhattan many dating back to the Civil War when this was a major shipping area. The home of the Dutch West Indies Company in the early 1600’s, this port area has seen many changes. The most modern ones when the Rouse Corporation turned this into a dining and shopping entertainment area setting up concept for many downtown’s in city’s that needed revitalizing. I had never seen it so quiet in the time of COVID-19. There was no one walking around this busy area but a few tourists and residents. In 2021, the mood had changed and it was much busier. I passed through the Seaport by 6:48pm.

South Street Seaport

South Street Seaport

Homepage

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g28953-d532147-Reviews-South_Street_Seaport_Historic_District-New_York.html?m=19905

As I was leaving the South Street Seaport in 2021, I was watching fire trucks leave in a hurry from one of the local firehouses. It caught my attention so much that I lost my footing for some reason and fell flat on my face. It was almost as if someone had tripped me.

From here it was again more overhangs from the highway until I got to the Ferry stations for Staten Island and Governors Island and then rounding the corner to make it to Battery Park where the sites of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island loomed in the distance. All over the harbor were sailboats and motor boats enjoying the early evening. It was now 7:15pm and I had been travelling since noon.

I spent about a half hour relaxing and enjoying the views on a sunny early evening. Being the day after the Summer Solstice it was one of the longest days of the year and I got to enjoy the extra sunshine. I needed to cool down and this was the place to do it. It still is one of the most picturesque places in New York City.

New York Harbor

New York Harbor in all its glory

My review of Battery Park:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d15614732-Reviews-Battery_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

I have to say that I never get tired of seeing Lady Liberty. I still can’t believe that I am seeing the same statute that both of my grandfathers’ saw when they arrived in this country. It puts it all into perspective to me how powerful of a symbol it is to this country as a way of welcoming people to the United States.

I had just walked the entire east side of Manhattan and I have to tell you I was stiff by this point. I was ready to throw in the towel here and rest but I pressed on wanting to get home at a decent time. I really misjudged how long it would take to get from the Battery to West 42nd Street.

In 2021, I was much better prepared and had more walking time under my belt. I was in much better shape so it did not tire me so much at this point of the walk. I was rearing to go after a half hour break.

I left Battery Park at 7:30pm and followed a crowd of people out of the park. Before I left the park for Battery Park City and its beautiful parks, I came across the sculpture “American Merchant Marines Memorial” at the edge of the Battery. The statue commemorates the thousands of merchant ships and crews that fought since the Revolutionary War (NYCParks.org).

American Merchant Marines Memorial

The “American Merchant Marines Memorial” by artist Marisol Escobar

Artist Marisol Escobar

Marisol Escobar

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marisol_Escobar

Ms. Escobar was born in Paris and raised in Venezuela and moved to New York in the 1950’s. She is known for her highly stylized boxy sculptures (NYCParks.org). She studied art at the Jepson Art Institute, the Ecole des Beaux Arts and Art Students League of New York (Wiki).

I left Battery Park and entered into the newer extension of Robert Wagner Jr. Park next to Battery Park City. In the front part of the park, I came across these unusual musical instrument sculptures that graced the entrance of the park.

The art entitled “Resonating Bodies” were created by British born artist Tony Cragg, whose work I had seen uptown many times. The sculptures resemble a lute and a tuba. The work is based on the concept that all physical bodies including ourselves are constantly enveloped by various energy forms (NYCParks.org).

Resognating Bodies

“Resonating Bodies” at Robert Wagner Jr. Park in Battery Park City

Artist Tony Cragg

Tony Cragg

https://www.tony-cragg.com/

Mr. Cragg is a British born artist from Liverpool and studied at the Gloucestershire School of Art, received his BA from the Wimbledon School of Art and his MA from the Royal School of Art. He has been showing his works since 1977. He is best know for his contemporary sculptures (Artist Bio/Wiki).

Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Park

I walked behind them as I travelled through the South Cove of Battery Park City. Not a lot of tourists know that this whole area is fill in of old piers on the fillers from the building of the original World Trade Center. Now the area sits apartment buildings with breathtaking views and well-landscaped parts. The South Cove was filled with small groups of people who were also not social distancing and very few masks. I think people were just throwing caution to the wind.

South Cove Park Battery City

Don’t miss the twists and turns of the South Cove of Battery Park City

Another interesting piece of sculpture I came across was the Mother Cabrini Memorial that was dedicated to the park in 2020.

Mother Cabrini

Mother Cabrini

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frances_Xavier_Cabrini

Mother Cabrini was born in Italy as Maria Francesca Cabrini in 1850. She took her vows and founded the Missionary of the Sacred Heart. She immigrated to the United States in 1889 and continued her charity work, founding organizations and was the first naturalized citizen to be canonized (NYCbio/MotherCabrini.org/Wiki).

Mother Cabrini Memorial

The “Mother Cabrini Memorial” in the South Cove

Mother Cabrini Memorial

The work was created by artists Jill Burkee and Giancarlo Baigi.

Jill and Giancarlo Baigi

Jill Burkee & Giancarlo Biagi

Jill Burkee is a sculpture and draftswoman who studied at the Arts Students League of New York and the University of Washington and has studied in Italy. Giancarlo Baigi is a sculptor and multi-media artist. He also studied at the Arts Students League of New York and has a MA from Stagio Stagi in Peitrasanta in Italy (Arts Students League bio).

When I walked the parks both North and South Coves in 2021, people were still having Graduation parties, small picnics and the restaurants had reopened both indoors and outdoors without masks. The parks, restaurants and lawns were really hopping that night.

From here it was following the path up to the North Cove of Battery Park City and the views of Jersey City. Each of the parks had unique landscaping and walkways that accented the buildings of the World Financial Center. It is hard to believe how damaged these were after the long days after 9/11. You would have never known with boats docked for dinner and people having picnics and wine in the shadows of these buildings.

North Cove Battery Park

North Cove in Battery Park City

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d109950-Reviews-Rockefeller_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

I was pretty surprised as I walked through the park with more daylight time to spare that I came across what looked like an Egyptian Temple sitting in Battery Park. The sculpture building is entitled “The Upper Room” designed by artist Ned Smyth. This self-contained sculptural environment suggests a contemporary reimagining of an Egyptian temple offering a stylized sanctuary from the surrounding city (BPCA-NYC).

The Upper Room

“The Upper Room” in Battery Park City Park

The Upper Room

Artist Ned Smyth

Ned Smyth

http://www.nedsmyth.com/

https://www.theartistprofilearchive.com/artist-profiles/ned-smyth#:~:text=Sculptor%20Ned%20Smyth%20lives%20and,from%20Kenyon%20College%20in%20Ohio.

Mr. Smyth is an American born artist who born in NYC and works in NY. He has a BA from Kenyon College in Ohio. He is part of the Pattern and Design Movement of the 1970’s and known for his large scale public works (Artist Bio/Artist Profile Bio).

As I started to pass some of the open air restaurants I saw another piece of art that stood out which was a series of colored rings but could not get close enough to see the artist who created it. For another trip to the park.

The last piece of art that stood out to me on this trip through Battery Park was entitled “Days End” by artist David Hammons. It looked like the shell of an empty building and struck a nerve as the sun started to set on the New Jersey side of the Hudson River. It is an ‘Open Air’ sculpture that explores the history of the neighborhood (Whitney Museum).

Days End

Days End by artist David Hammons

Artist David Hammons

David Hammons

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Hammons

http://www.artnet.com/artists/david-hammons/

Mr. Hammons is an American born artist who studied at the Chouinard Art Institute (CalArts) and at Otis Art Institute.  He is known for his Body Prints and sculpture work (Wiki/Artnet.com).

As the light started to fade in the evening as the sunset over Jersey City across the river, I started to fade too. I just singing to myself and kept encouraging myself to keep moving. I really wanted to finish even though my thighs were getting stiff and my fingers looked like sausages. I was determined even though I wanted to stop. Every time I asked that question of myself I then said ‘then why did I start the walk if I was not going to finish it?’

I stopped for a second to look at the sun setting in the backdrop of Jersey City and watched in wonder the beauty of it all. It is almost a reminder how much bigger the world is than us.

Jersey City at Sunset

The Jersey City Waterfront at sunset

While I was walking through the parks, a few pieces of park sculpture stood out to me as I reached Hudson River Park in Chelsea. The long trek up Joe DiMaggio Highway made me more aware of my surroundings as I had to stop again. I came across the ‘Serpentine Sculptures’, these large twisting metal concoctions that graced the riverfront walkway.

Serpentine Sculpture by Marc Gibian

‘Serpentine Sculptures’ in Hudson River Park

My review of Hudson River Park on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d4545669-Reviews-Hudson_River_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

These interesting twisted sculptures are by American artist Mark Gabian who holds a BA in Art History and BFA in Sculpture from Cornell University (my Alma Mater!). Mr. Gabian’s sculptures can be seen all over the world. The artist has been quoted as saying he created monumental site-specific commissions in two or three dimensions’ (the artist’s website).

Mark Gabian artist

Artist Mark Gabian

http://www.markgibian.com/

The last leg of the journey loomed in the distance as I saw the lights of the Hudson Yards in the distance like a mythical ‘Oz’ waiting for me. I saw the heliport and observation deck glittering in the distance and knew I had to reach it.

Hudson River Yards

The Hudson Yards in Chelsea

https://www.hudsonyardsnewyork.com/

The Observation Deck and the glittering buildings are just a few blocks from the Port Authority Bus Terminal where my journey started and I knew I was there.  In 2020, I reached the Circle Line Pier again at 9:11pm in the evening and I celebrated by sitting on a boulder outside the ticket booth for fifteen minutes watching the security guard play on his cellphone.

I was not tired Per Se but I was stiff all over. I could feel my thighs tighten up and my fingers and hands I had to shake several times to get proper circulation back into them. Still I was not out of breath and was able to walk back to the Port Authority and make the 9:50pm bus out of New York City for home. I got home by 10:10pm almost sixteen hours later.

In 2020, I walked the entire rim of Manhattan from top to bottom in fourteen hours. Not the twelve hours the Great Saunter Walk guide says but there is a lot more to it then just walking. You will need many bathroom, water and rest breaks along the way.  Drink lots of water too. Still it was a great walk and one for the blog!

In 2021, I arrived back at Hudson River Park at West 23rd Street just as the sun started to set over New Jersey and got to see the multi colors that were created in the sky. Mother Nature’s work of art for everyone to see.

I was not as tired on this trip as I had the year before. All that walking and training in Midtown Manhattan neighborhoods plus an overnight stay in the City to get an earlier start helped out tremendously. I finished the perimeter walk of the island in exactly fourteen hours, one hour more than 2020 but I stopped more times to admire public artworks, snack at restaurants and snack shops and walk through more parks and neighborhoods to see what was there. It was a more interesting trip where I did not rush it. I finished at 8:20pm in 2021.

For dinner that night, I stopped at Lions & Tigers & Squares at 268 West 23rd Street, where I had eaten many times for lunch after working at the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen (which I had mentioned many times in this blog). The restaurant features Detroit style pizza where the cheese and sauce are baked into the sides of the pizza and there is no crust. It is a type of Sicilian pizza with a twist to it.

Lions and Tigers

Lions & Tigers & Squares at 268 West 23rd Street

https://www.lionsandtigersandsquares.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ltspizza/

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d14124878-Reviews-Lions_Tigers_Squares_Detroit_Pizza-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

My review on DiningonaShoeStringinNYC@Wordpress.com:

https://diningonashoestringinnyc.wordpress.com/tag/lions-tigers-squares/

I treated myself to a sausage pizza which was loaded with fried sweet sausage, caramelized onions and they put a dash of maple syrup on top to add to the complexity. God was that delicious! There is so much flavor in each bite. I was not even planning on eating there but the pizza cook waved me inside and then sold me on it. I was lucky that he did!

Sausage pizza

Do not miss the Sausage Slice at Lions & Tigers & Squares

It was another great trip around the Island of Manhattan trying new restaurants and visiting old ones, viewing wonderful public art in the open air art museum that New York City is, touring interesting parks and feeling like part of the neighborhood.

For people who say that New York City is going downhill during COVID, I say to you walk the whole island and you will see the heart of the City is in the people who live here and the contributions they make to keep the City as great as it is. Remember there is more to Manhattan than just Midtown and Times Square. There is so much more to see!

I dedicate these  walks to my father, Warren Watrel, as my Father’s Day Gift of Remembrance. To my dad for all the wonderful afternoons we spent in New York City on Father’s Day. I felt you by my side that afternoon.

Happy Father’s Day to all Fathers!

Dad and I

Justin Watrel with his father, Warren Watrel

Happy Father’s Day Dad!

With much love from your son Justin!

Taco Bandito 325 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10001

In honor of Small Business Saturday, I featuring wonderful reasonable restaurants in New York City.

Taco Bandito II

The food here is very good.

Taco Bandito III

Dining on a Shoe String in NYC

Taco Bandito

325 Eight Avenue (between 26th and 27th Streets in Chelsea)

New York, NY  10001

(212) 989-5518/5571

Fax: (212) 989-5537

http://www.tacobandito.com

http://www.tacobanditochelsea.com

Open: Seven Days a Week

Monday-Saturday: 11:00am-11:00pm

Sunday: 12:00pm-10:00pm

Fast Free Delivery (minimum $8.00, minimum credit card charge $8.00)

*Their flour tortillas are made fresh throughout the day.

*Their food is prepared from scratch daily at this restaurant.

*All our food is prepared with natural ingredients only.

*We do not use artificial spices, MSG, lard or preservatives.

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d4966729-Reviews-Taco_Bandito-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

Taco Bandito is right around the corner from the Soup Kitchen where I work and around the corner from the Fashion Institute of Technology campus where I went to school. The prices here are perfect for the normal college student as there is nothing on the menu over $10.00.

The menu is more of a Tex-Mexican food selection with many popular items. The menu contains…

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5 Star Estrella Bakery Corporation 3861 Broadway New York, NY 10032

In honor of Small Business Saturday, I am featuring wonderful reasonable restaurants in New York City. Don’t miss the delicious baked goods and empanadas at this bakery! It’s worth the trip uptown.

5 star estrella bakery

The selection of baked goods at 5 Star Estrella Bakery is extensive.

Dining on a Shoe String in NYC

5 Star Estrella Bakery Corporation

3861 Broadway

New York, NY  10032

(212) 795-5000

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d4416394-Reviews-5_Estrella_Bakery-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

I have been to 5 Star Estrella Bakery Corporation about ten times since my project, “MywalkinManhattan” has taken me to this part of the city. Washington Heights has all sorts of bodega’s and deli’s on every corner of the neighborhood but this one stands out. Everything here is very reasonable and delicious (See my reviews on TripAdvisor).

I have to admit that the baked goods can be a little hard later in the afternoon but the taste is still wonderful. I have had their vanilla and chocolate doughnuts and they are big, puffy rings with a thick layer of icing ($1.25). In the early morning, they have a soft pillowy consistency and in the afternoon, they can be a little harder but still good.

They have wonderful Pastellitos (similar to empanadas) filled…

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